Lec5_Nordahl_PublicProduce_ch1_5

Lec5_Nordahl_PublicProduce_ch1_5 - V U ~ ~ i1 . = . ~ l- ~...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
~ I: V 0 "'0 U i1 V"l = ...... V"l3 UJ - "'C o:::~ .... l- '"d CL C s:: Z § ...t:) .6 «~ u :a ...-1 !!!~ Q cu
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Contents Preface INTRODUCTION Serendipity CHAPTER ONE Food Security CHAPTER TWO Public Space, Public Officials, Public Policy CHAPTER THREE To Glean and Forage in the City CHAPTER FOUR Maintenance and Aesthetics ix xi 15 45 69 91
Background image of page 2
CHAPTER ONE Food Security To put it simply, Americans have been eating oil and natural gas for the past century, at an ever-accelerating pace. Without the massive "inputs" of cheap gasoline and diesel fuel for machines, irrigation, and trucking, or petroleum-based herbicides and pesticides, or fertilizers made out of natural gas, Americans will be compelled to radically reorganize the way food is produced, or starve. James Howard Kunstler, The Long Emergency! A rugula became an unlikely-and politically controversial-metonym for .l"\iresh produce and the escalating cost of food in America during the 2008 presidential campaign. While stumping in the Hawkeye State in the summer of 2007, Senator Barack Obama-then a front-runner for the Democratic nomination-lamented the rising cost of arugula sold at Whole Foods, por- tending that fresh produce and healthy food was fast becoming out of financial reach of middle and rural America. The irony of his statements is that they were made in Iowa, a state that does not have a single Whole Foods store, and that 15
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
16 Public Produce Iowans, like most Americans, cannot afford much of Whole Foods' inventory anyway-arugula or otherwise. Iowa is also a state that produces an abundance of corn and soybeans, but not arugula. And Iowans, like many Americans, refer to arugula by its more common, English-derived name: rocket. Though pundits on both sides agree that Obama's "arugula moment" was a political gaffe, his un- derlying message was on point. Our nation's food- from beef, milk, and eggs, to corn, rice, and soy, and even to fresh produce like arugula-is, pardon the pun, rocketing in price. And, as the price of oil has risen with the price of food and our economy has crumbled around us, Americans, for the first time in many generations, are beginning to understand what developing countries have al- ways known: food security is economic security is national security. In an open letter to the 2008 president-elect, journalist and best-selling au- thor Michael Pollan outlined just how our current system of food production is compromising national security. Pollan argues that our complete reliance on fossil fuels for food production spells imminent catastrophe as the era of cheap and abundant-and nonrenewable-energy comes to a close. His arguments deftly illustrate the escalating futility of conventional agriculture. Pollan notes that in 1940, 1 calorie of fossil fuel energy produced 2.3 calories of food energy. But with today's industrial system of agriculture, the ratio has flipped to an inef- ficient, unsustainable equation, as it takes 10 calories of fossil-fuel energy to produce just 1 calorie of modern supermarket food. Pollan maintains that the
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 10/26/2011 for the course ECON 123 at Rutgers.

Page1 / 28

Lec5_Nordahl_PublicProduce_ch1_5 - V U ~ ~ i1 . = . ~ l- ~...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online