Lec8_LyndonMoore_ChamberMemPalace

Lec8_LyndonMoore_ChamberMemPalace - - l C HAMBERS D ONLYN F...

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,Ie "WIllfUl- l - l' CHAMBERS FOR A MEMORY PALACE DONLYN LYNDON AND CHARLES W. MOOR E WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AU T HOR S THE MIT PRESS CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS LONDON, ENGLAND
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) CONTENTS 6~mmO~.b~. () ROOFS THAT ENCOMPASS I CANOPIES THAT CENTER 122 7 MARKERS THAT COMMAND I ALLIES THAT INHABIT 148 (I' LIGHT THAT PLAYS I SHADOW THAT HAUNTS I SHADE THAT LULLS 176 COMPOSITIONS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS IX .9 ROOMS THAT DEFINE / SPACE THAT LEAKS Up INTO THE LIGHT 192 INTROD UCTION xi THEMES 10 TYPES THAT RECUR I ORDER THAT COMES AND GOES 214 I AX ES THAT REACH / PATHS THAT WANDER 2 II SHAPES THAT REMIND I ORNAMENT THAT TRANSMITS, TRANSFORMS, AND ENCOD ES 230 :? ORCHARDS THAT MEASURE I PILASTERS THAT TEMPER 28 12 GARDENS THAT CIVILIZE 252 s PLATFORMS THAT SEPARATE I SLOPES THAT JOIN / STAIRS THAT CLIMB AND PAUSE 50 IS WATER THAT POOLS AND CONNECTS 264 -1 BORDERS THAT CONTROL / WALLS THAT LAYER I POCKETS 14 IMAGES THAT MOTIVATE 282 THAT OFFER CHOICE AND CHANGE 78 POSTSCRIPT: THE CASTELLO DI GARGONZA 296 ,i OPENINGS THAT FRAME I PORTALS THAT BESPEAK 98 INDEX 311
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INTRODUCTION The Idea of Place alld a Place for Ideas Two thousand years ago Marcus Tullius Cicero used to make two-hour speeches in the Roman Senate, without notes, by constructing in his mind a palace whose rooms and furnishings, as he imagined himself roaming through them, called up the ideas he wished to discuss: ideas were made memorable by locating them in space. Cicero, we would like to think, lived in a world (or at least could imagine one) in which space and structure had a clear and recognizable order. Traditions governing the organiza- tion of rooms and building parts allowed them to be related to each other, yet they were sufficiently differentiated so that they could serve as reminders of events and experiences that took place within them. You could tell one space from another either by its position in a larger pattern or by its distinctive shape or characterizing detail. It's all rather startlingly like the "architecture" of computers, with information stored by loca- tion and accessed by a system of coordinates (or by a mouse darting around on the screen, nibbling at images positioned in boxes). The architectures of places then made it possible to think about them with some subtlety and to ally particular ideas and events with specific forms and shapes and their relation- ships. Places could bring emotions, recollections, people, and even ideas to mind; their qualities were a part of a culture's intellectual equipment.
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.9 'g """ E ..:; What Cicero was able to take for granted we must at this point discover. The scope of change in our everyday envi- ronments has outpaced the accumulation of wisdom and craft that traditionally guided the making of places; indeed, much of what was previously known has in haste been set aside, leaving a blank slate. Worse yet, there are those who would abandon the tangible world altogether in favor of a virtual reality assem- bled in computer networks- Memory Palaces dislodged from
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Lec8_LyndonMoore_ChamberMemPalace - - l C HAMBERS D ONLYN F...

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