Bonnie and Clyde Response

Bonnie and Clyde Response - John Hawkins Expressive...

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Unformatted text preview: John Hawkins Expressive Cultures: Film Bill Simon/Noah Tsika 3:30-4:45 February 16 th , 2011 The Depiction of Violence in Bonnie and Clyde When we first meet Bonnie Parker she is in the nude, tumbling around her room, seemingly frustrated by her boredom. This is the only brief flash of near-Edenic innocence we see of her before she enters into her life of crime after meeting Clyde Barrow. The audience is ready to imagine her as a women who views all that is different as being inherently special and all that is thrilling as being inherently valuable. She is an Eve without an Adam, even more readily drawn to the serpent. Or perhaps in a reversal of roles, she is the lonely Adam, waiting for an Eve (Clyde Barrow) to lead her to the Tree of Knowledge and out of the Garden. Through these bored and innocent eyes of Bonnie Parker we see violence as perhaps not glorious or valorized, but as an essential part of an exciting life. During the car chase to the state line of Oklahoma the camera is set at a distance, the long shots soaking up all of the action to the tune of a...
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Bonnie and Clyde Response - John Hawkins Expressive...

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