The Wild Bunch Response

The Wild Bunch Response - John Hawkins Expressive Cultures:...

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Unformatted text preview: John Hawkins Expressive Cultures: Film Bill Simon/Noah Tsika 3:30-4:45 February 23 rd , 2011 The Wild Bunch & Vietnam The sentiment in Vietnam that Slotkin points out, that You were as responsible for everything you saw as well as for everything you did (584), is perhaps the essential allegorical aspect that The Wild Bunch captures of the war. We are introduced to it in the first scene, where the children burn scorpions and ants after watching them fight each other, their giggling faces freeze-framed in black- and-white just as the characters of the Bunch. The metaphor for the sentiment completes itself as Pike is manning the machine gun in Agua Verde. Though resilient up to this point to all the wounds he's endured, he falls to the ground after being shot by a child. Child and killer mirror each other (598) in this moment, and it seems all too natural it should end this way. The child is behind a gate of bars that resemble a prison, perhaps representing the inescapability of human nature or of the human condition...
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The Wild Bunch Response - John Hawkins Expressive Cultures:...

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