Key%20Concepts%20and%20Ideas%20to%20consider%20for%20the%20second%20midterm

Key%20Concepts%20and%20Ideas%20to%20consider%20for%20the%20second%20midterm

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Key Concepts and Ideas to consider for the second midterm (March 25) As we discussed yesterday, the structure of this exam will differ to some degree from the first midterm. We’ll have a few more multiple choice and short answer questions and not have any writing section. We discussed the beginning of the Classical Period through the lens of Persian involvement in the Greek peninsula. The history of the early stages of this period are complicated. The ‘Tyrannicides’ – Harmodius and Aristogeiton – assassinate the brother of the tyrant Hippias. Hippias himself is expelled from Athens a few years later (in 511 BCE). After about a year, the institution of democracy is created in Athens and lasts for about a century. The statue group of the Tyrannicides, placed in the public square of Athens called the Agora, is created by the government of Athens to commemorate the events of Hipparchus’ assassination, in spite of the apparent fact that the actual circumstances of his death may not have been entirely political. However, the importance of the image of these two men, we which can infer from Roman copies of the original statues, should not be underestimated within the social fabric of the city of Athens. The Persian invasion of 480/479 results in the destruction of the Athenian acropolis and the subsequent Athenian efforts to renovate the area left after the defeat of Persia in 479. This issue is tied to the emergence of the Athenian empire and the money Athens realizes from contributions to the treasury from the various ‘allied’ states. This money is then invested in the construction of the Parthenon, along with many other buildings throughout the region of Attika. The political figure primarily responsible for this investment of money into the Athenian state was Pericles. The Parthenon
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course CLASSICS 103 at UMass (Amherst).

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Key%20Concepts%20and%20Ideas%20to%20consider%20for%20the%20second%20midterm

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