09 Caribbean families

09 Caribbean families - ENGLISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: ENGLISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN FAMILIES: AFRICAN AND INDO SFL 354 African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations Marriage career routinely consists of: Visiting relationships (particularly among low income group): where sexual/social partners are non-cohabiting African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations Marriage career routinely consists of: Visiting relationships (particularly among low income group): where sexual/social partners are non-cohabiting Common-law relationships: resources and dwelling are shared, gender roles are traditional, couple often has children from previous relationships African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations Marriage career routinely consists of: Visiting relationships (particularly among low income group): where sexual/social partners are non-cohabiting Common-law relationships: resources and dwelling are shared, gender roles are traditional, couple often has children from previous relationships Progressive dating/mating by members of both sexes until period of mid-30s to mid-50s when: Marital unions are formed or Single-parent households are more or less solidified (women- headed households range from 22% in Guyana to 45% in Grenada) African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations Traditional roles: Favor the man in cases of economic responsibility to children and former partners. Laws exist but are not enforced. African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations Traditional roles: Favor the man in cases of economic responsibility to children and former partners. Laws exist but are not enforced. Designate the man as breadwinner and charge the woman to focus on childrearing and other household maintenance responsibilities Dissolutions of relationships are common and women are usually the constant in terms of household decision-making and childrearing duties. This results in women being the de facto head of household even though mens positions as primary breadwinner would traditionally allow for this role or status. African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations Arrival at a legal marital union is usually viewed as a positive step and sign of relative security but the assumption is not one of finding a soulmate and a source of personal happiness African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations Arrival at a legal marital union is usually viewed as a positive step and sign of relative security but the assumption is not one of finding a soulmate and a source of personal happiness Proclivity toward nonmarital unions in African Caribbean families is somewhat unique (compared to other world cultures) and is generally viewed as being related to: African Caribbean Couple/Marital Relations...
View Full Document

This document was uploaded on 10/28/2011 for the course PSYCH 341 at BYU.

Page1 / 25

09 Caribbean families - ENGLISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online