ch6_ID2e_slides part 1

ch6_ID2e_slides part 1 - Chapter6:...

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Chapter 6:  Interfaces and interactions
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Overview Introduce the notion of a paradigm Provide an overview of the many  different kinds of interfaces highlight the main design and research  issues for each of the different interfaces Consider which interface is best for a  given application or activity
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Paradigms Refers to a particular approach that has been  adopted by a community in terms of shared  assumptions, concepts, values and practices Questions to be asked and how they should be  framed Phenomena to be observed How findings from experiments are to be analyzed  and interpreted
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Paradigms in HCI The predominant 80s paradigm was to design user- centred applications for the single user on the  desktop  Shift in thinking occured in the mid 90s Many technological advances led to a new generation  of  user–computer environments e.g.,  virtual reality, multimedia, agent interfaces, ubiquitous  computing   Effect of moving interaction design ‘beyond the  desktop’ resulted in many new challenges, questions,  and phenomena being considered
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Ubicomp  Would radically change the way people  think about and interact with computers Computers would be designed to be  embedded in the environment Major rethink of what HCI is in this  context
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New thinking How to enable people to access and interact with  information in their work, social, and everyday lives Designing user experiences for people using  interfaces that are part of the environment with no  controlling devices What form to provide contextually-relevant  information to people at appropriate times and places Ensuring that information, that is passed around via  interconnected displays, devices, and objects, is  secure and trustworthy
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Interface types Many, many kinds now 1980s interfaces Command  WIMP/GUI   1990s interfaces Advanced graphical (multimedia, virtual reality, information visualization) Web  Speech (voice)  Pen, gesture, and touch  Appliance  2000s interfaces Mobile  Multimodal Shareable  Tangible  Augmented and mixed reality  Wearable  Robotic
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Command interfaces Commands such as abbreviations (e.g., ls)  typed in at the prompt to which the system  responds (e.g., listing current files) Some are hard wired at keyboard, e.g., delete Efficient, precise, and fast Large overhead to learning set of commands
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Research and design issues Form, name types and structure are key  research questions Consistency is most important design  principle e.g., always use first letter of command Command interfaces popular for web  scripting QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course IE 435 at SUNY Buffalo.

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ch6_ID2e_slides part 1 - Chapter6:...

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