ch6_ID2e_slides part 2 (1)

ch6_ID2e_slides part 2 (1) - Webinterfaces...

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Web interfaces Early websites were largely text-based,  providing hyperlinks  Concern was with how best to structure  information at the interface to enable users to  navigate and access it easily and quickly Nowadays, more emphasis on making pages  distinctive, striking, and pleasurable
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Useit.com
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Swim
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Usability versus attractiveness  debate Vanilla or multi-flavor design? Ease of finding something versus aesthetic and  enjoyable experience Web designers are:   “thinking great literature”  Users read the web like a:  “billboard going by at 60 miles an hour” (Krug,  2000) Need to determine how to brand a web page  to catch and keep ‘eyeballs’
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Research and design issues Web interfaces are getting more like GUIs Need to consider how best to design, present,  and structure information and system  behavior  But also content and navigation are central Veen’s design principles (1)Where am I?  (2)Where can I go? (3) What’s here?  
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Activity Look at the Nike.com website  What kind of website is it?  How does it contravene the design principles  outlined by Veen?  Does it matter?  What kind of user experience is it providing  for?  What was your experience of engaging with  it?
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Nike.com
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Speech interfaces Where a person talks with a system that has  a spoken language application, e.g.,  timetable, travel planner Used most for inquiring about very specific  information, e.g., flight times or to perform a  transaction, e.g., buy a ticket Also used by people with disabilities e.g., speech recognition word processors, page  scanners, web readers, home control systems
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Have speech interfaces come of  age?
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Get me a human operator! Most popular use of speech interfaces  currently is for call routing Caller-led speech where users state their  needs in their own words e.g., “I’m having problems with my voice mail”  Idea is they are automatically forwarded to  the appropriate service  What is your experience of such systems?
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Format Directed dialogs are where the system is in control of  the conversation Ask specific questions and require specific responses More flexible systems allow the user to take the  initiative:   e.g., “I’d like to go to Paris next Monday for two weeks.” More chance of error, since caller might assume that  the system is like a human Guided prompts can help callers back on track     e.g., “Sorry I did not get all that. Did you say you wanted to  fly next Monday?”
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Research and design issues How to design systems that can keep 
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ch6_ID2e_slides part 2 (1) - Webinterfaces...

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