Renaissance Theatre - Renaissance Theatre: Italy Resources...

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Renaissance Theatre: Italy Resources Text. .. Wilson and Goldfarb. Theatre: The Lively Art , 7th edition: Chapter 13, pages 274 - 282. Outside reading. .. Barnard Hewitt, editor. The Renaissance Stage: Documents of Serlio, Sabbattini and Furttenbach . Coral Gables, FL: University of Miami Press. 1958. Opera. .. Claudio Monteverdi. Orfeo Giuseppe Verdi. Aida 1. When was the Italian renaissance? 1400 to 1620. 2. What was the Commedia dell'arte ? A Comedia Performance The commedia , the "comedy of professional artists," was the popular theatre of Renaissance Italy. 3. How did it differ from other theatre groups? There were no scripts. All of the dialogue and much of the business was improvised. 4. What type of comedy did the commedia perform? Farce. Low comedy. Comedy of pain. Slapstick. Four names for the same type of humor. 5. Why is physical comedy also known as slapstick comedy? Much of the humor in a commedia presentation was produced by one character beating another. The prop used to administer these beatings was called a batacchio or bataccio -- a "slapstick" in English. It was supposed to produce more sound than pain. 6. What was the scenario ?
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The plot outline posted back stage. Lazzi ? Bits of comic business, performed by the actors, which were inserted into the play. The specific lazzi to be performed was often indicated in the scenario . 7. Why can many of the commedia's lazzi not be used on stage today? Because many of these bits, especially those dealing with bodily functions would be considered obscene, or at least in bad taste, by a modern audience. 8. Describe the stock characters used by the commedia . The Straights The straights -- A pair of young lovers. They were handsome, well-educated and witty. The dapper young man was usually opposed in his love affair by one of the masters (or perhaps his father). The young lady was sophisticated, noble and innocent. The character roles were divided into two major groups -- The Masters and. .. Il Capitano -- a pompous braggart and coward who boasted of his great prowess in love and battle, but was usually discredited in both. Pantalone -- a greedy, lustful, meddling old man. Often a merchant. Il Dottore -- often a friend of Pantalone . He was a professor (or physician) who spouted inaccurate Latin. His standard dress was the academic cap and gown.
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Il Capitano The Servants. Il Zanni There were at least two servants or zanni . One smart and one less smart. The less smart servant was usually an insolent liar, thief and/or drunkard. Much (perhaps most) of the humor came through the actions of the servants. The stock comedia characters, in their traditional costumes, can be seen in the painting on page 277. 9. How do these characters compare with those used by Plautus? The stock characters of the
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course THEA 101 at Northern State University.

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Renaissance Theatre - Renaissance Theatre: Italy Resources...

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