Television - Television: History and Production Resources...

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Television: History and Production Resources Outside reading. .. Erik Barnouw. Tube of Plenty . New York: Oxford University Press. 1990 Tim Brooks and Earle Marsh. The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network TV Shows, 1946 - Present. New York: Ballantine Books. 1992. Richard Lindheim and Richard Blum. Inside Television Producing . Boston: Focal Press. 1991. Vince Waldron. Classic Sitcoms: A Celebration of the Best of Prime Time Comedy . New York: Macmillan. 1987. Internet. .. ABC | CBS | NBC | FOX | CW | PBS | SD-PBS Tim's TV Showcase A U. S. Television Chronology, 1875-1970 1. When did commercial television broadcasting begin? FDR Opens the 1939 World's Fair Note how fuzzy the picture was in 1939 1939: President Franklin Roosevelt's opening of the 1939 New York World's Fair is broadcast live from NBC's experimental station -- W2XBS -- in New York City. In 1939 W2XBS was on the air 4 hours a day (2:30-4:30 and 8:30-10:30pm EST), 5 days a week, Wednesday through Sunday. 1941: In July, both NBC (WNBT on channel 1) and CBS (WCBW on channel 2) come on the air with a commercial station, again in New York City. Both stations still exist. They are now WNBC (Channel 4) and WCBS (Channel 2). Further development is halted by World War II. 1946: The war is over, only 6 station are on-air and both networks, NBC and CBS, begin to expand. 1948: Four television networks, (NBC, CBS, ABC, and DuMont), broadcasting over 128 stations, begin a full prime-time schedule (8 to 11pm, Eastern Time), seven days a week. In what city? New York City When did television arrive in South Dakota? Television arrived in South Dakota in May 1953 when KELO-TV began broadcasting in Sioux Falls. Five years later, in November 1958, KXAB (now KABY) goes on the air on channel 9 in Aberdeen.
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2. What was the relationship between radio drama and early television programming? The Advent ures of Ozzie and Harriet Most early (1948 to 1960) television shows, both dramatic and non- dramatic, originate d on radio . For many programs -- The Adventure s of Ozzie and Harriet (1 944- 1954), Fa ther Knows Best (194 9-1954), Dragnet ( 1949- 1956) -- the transition was easy: the cast performed in a television or film studio instead of a radio station. For the actor, a TV
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productio n required a longer time committm ent. A radio show was normally produced in one day -- a read through in the morning, a "dress" rehearsal in the afternoon, and the performan ce that evening. A half hour filmed television show required the actor to be in front of the camera for three or four, 10 to 12 hour days.
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William Conrad For other productions, the switch was much more difficult. William Conrad (1920- 1994) created the role of U.S. Marshall Matt Dillon in the radio version of Gunsmoke (1952-1961). When CBS decided to bring Gunsmoke to television in 1955, the network executivies decided that although Conrad sounded like a US Marshall, he didn't look like one. At 5' 9" and 270 pounds, the portly, balding, mustached Conrad looked more like a villain than a western hero. James Arness
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course THEA 101 at Northern State University.

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Television - Television: History and Production Resources...

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