Plain-Carbon-steels - Microstructures of Plain Carbon...

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Objective : This purpose of this laboratory exercise is divided into two parts. Part A will require you to know the phase diagram of Fe-C and microstructures development of plain carbon steel with different carbon contents and temperatures. Part B you will also be asked to observe the changes in mechanical strength in plain carbon steels with different carbon content while using similar heat treatment schedule. Readings : Read Callister 8 th Chapter 9 Introduction : The Fe-C system is of profound technical significance to industrial society. Endless variety of performance can be made from the same constituents, from soft and easily machined alloys and inexpensive structural materials, to ultra-high strength and super- tough metals for exotic applications. Most importantly, it is possible to radically alter the properties of an Fe-C alloy using simple techniques involving mechanical working and heat treating (thermomechanical treatments). This allows us, for example, to begin the production of a complex helical transmission gear by machining a soft form of steel called spheroidite. Once the final shape has been machined, simple processing can give the finished gear very high strength, high surface hardness and wear resistance, and very good toughness. Historically, the first Fe-C alloys used were the cast-irons , these alloys containing Fe and more than 2-3 wt% of carbon. Only much later was the steels made. Steels typically have less than a few tenths percent carbon. Fe-C Phase diagram
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Plain-Carbon-steels - Microstructures of Plain Carbon...

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