Global Health Midterm Study guide

Global Health - Global Health Midterm Study guide The exam will consist of 25-30 short answer/fill-in-blank/short essay questions based key course

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Global Health Midterm Study guide The exam will consist of 25-30 short answer/fill-in-blank/short essay questions based key course concepts, facts and content. These questions will be designed to assess your knowledge of global health and with the course material. A good study strategy would be to study the lectures, plus your notes. You should strive for maximum specificity in your answers. Generalized responses that do not refer to specific facts or data will receive lower scores. You should be prepared to answer questions on the following topics: 1. What are current patterns of disease and how have they changed over time? 2. How have causes of death changed over time, and what are the patterns? 3. What are leading causes of death for children? 4. Epi transition theory 5. Health in complex societies (use questions from slides) 6. Nutrition: significant kinds of undernutrition/malnutrition, key micronutrient deficiencies (include Qs from Rx for survival) 7. Measures of nutritional status (anthropometry). 8. how does nutritional status impact morbidity/mortality 9. What are EIDs? What are factors driving the spread of EIDs? 10. Jones et al., Article - eids 11. Patz et al., article. 12. Discuss the 2 important diseases endemic in Africa, sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis) and river blindness (onchocerciasis). Describe the life cycles of the pathogens, vector and key reservoirs. Describe transmission, social factors and preventive measures. How do these two diseases differ in their human impact, and what are key issues in the social, cultural and ecological history of these two diseases? What impacts do they have on economic productivity in the region? a. Trypanosomiasis – sleeping disease caused by parasitic protozoan trypanosomes in Africa from 1890s to present a.i. Life cycle of pathogens a.i.1. Tsetse flies bites infected host and acquired blood a.i.2. Parasite is transformed to trypomastigotes in fly’s gut a.i.3. Carried through the bloodstream to other saliva a.i.4. Trypomastigotes multiply by binary fusion a.i.5. Infects other humans by putting parasite into tissue a.ii. Key Reservoirs – Humans, and some animals a.iii. Vector – Tsetse flies a.iv. Transmission – infected fly to humans a.v. Preventative Measures a.v.1. Large scale deforestation to deny the tsetse its natural habitat a.v.2. Game destruction to destroy the infection reservoirs like in East Africa during the 1950’s.
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a.v.3. Large scale use of insecticides which in turn helped to cause the great drought of sub-Saharan Africa a.vi. Social Cultural and Ecological History (vi-ix) a.vi.1. Colonial powers opened up Africa which in turn led to the travel of disease from their concentrated foci across the continent. a.vi.2.
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This document was uploaded on 10/28/2011 for the course ANTH 319 at UNC.

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Global Health - Global Health Midterm Study guide The exam will consist of 25-30 short answer/fill-in-blank/short essay questions based key course

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