460082811

460082811 - Plant Diversity We have all observed some degree of the variety found amongst the worlds plants From those experiences we might begin

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Plant Diversity We have all observed some degree of the variety found amongst the world’s plants. From those experiences we might begin thinking about how to identify different types, assign useful, descriptive names, and classify (categorize) groups of types. Plant taxonomy involves those efforts of identifying, naming, and classifying plants. Plant systematics adds to that study of diversity the consideration of evolutionary relationships as the basis for description and classification. Carl Linnaeus, a noted 18 th century Swedish naturalist, developed two important tools for the description of biological diversity: a hierarchical classification system (kingdom-phylum-class-order-family- genus-species) and binomial nomenclature (assignment of a unique, two part Latin name to each species). A century later, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, independently proposed the theory of biological evolution by natural selection, which has provided a means for understanding the emergence of diversity over time and for assessing relationships among different types of organisms. While Darwin and Wallace formed their theory from wide-ranging field studies, Gregor Mendel, a contemporary of
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course BOT 460 taught by Professor Clambey during the Fall '11 term at ND State.

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