lecture11

lecture11 - Astronomy 3 The Nature of the Universe...

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Astronomy 3: The Nature of the Universe Professor Alice Shapley Lecture 11: Extrasolar Planets The Sun (NGC 1499 Image credit: Markus Noller, Deep Sky Images)
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Logistics Quiz #5: due Monday, May 9th, 10 pm. Available at CCLE website https://ccle.ucla.edu/course/view/11S-ASTR3-2
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Logistics Midterm #2 , next Thursday, May 12 th , in class. The midterm will take place in the regular lecture hall, Math Sciences 4000A -- i.e., this room. Most important : bring a photo ID and a #2 (i.e. normal) pencil. Recommended: bring a calculator (though you may not need it). I will provide scantrons. Review session : Tuesday, May 10 th , 6-8 pm, also in Math Sciences 4000A.
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Logistics Exam will have a mixture of multiple choice, matching, and true/ false. Exam will emphasize material on The Solar System, Terrestrial and Jovian Planets, Extrasolar Planets, and the Sun. This material corresponds to lectures 6-11. The relevant reading from the textbook is: Chapters 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14. If relevant to these topics, I will assume you remember material from the first part of the course (e.g., Doppler shift, gravitational force, meaning of temperature, conservation of energy). A few questions will be based on Labs.
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Review from Last Time Jovian moons, rings. Extrasolar planets: the challenge of finding them.
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Search for Extrasolar Planets 2 reasons it is hard to find extrasolar planets: 1) They are small and hard to distinguish spatially from their host stars. 2) They are much, much, much, much, much, much fainter than the sun-like stars they orbit (~billion times fainter in reflected optical light). Everything changed back in 1995, with the discovery of a planet orbiting a star, called 51 Pegasi. This is now the most rapidly growing field of astronomy, with >500 extrasolar planets known, and >1000 likely candidates for planets announced by the most latest planet-hunting space mission known as Kepler . http://exoplanet.eu/catalog.php
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Review from Last Time Jovian moons, rings. Extrasolar planets: the challenge of finding them. Planet detection techniques: Radial velocity “RV” method. 499 planets found this way. Selection effect to find close-in, massive planets (largest, most rapidly varying Doppler shift in star spectrum.) Direct imaging method. 24 planets found this way. Good for finding planets that are farther out. Transit method (pre-Kepler mission). 128 planets found this way.
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Gravitational Tugs Technical term: radial velocity or “RV” method. Until recently, this was the most common way of finding planets. Newton’s 3 rd law : planet and star exert equal and opposite gravitational forces on each other. Orbit common “center of mass.” (Point at which objects would balance if connected – Lab 5.) When one object is much larger than the other (Sun vs. planet), the larger object
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This note was uploaded on 10/28/2011 for the course ASTR 3 taught by Professor Hauser during the Spring '07 term at UCLA.

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lecture11 - Astronomy 3 The Nature of the Universe...

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