water_resources - WaterResources QuantityandQuality...

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Water Resources
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Quantity and Quality we will focus on  quantity  today later in the semester we will talk about quality
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Water on Earth
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What do we get from water resources? water for direct consumption/use agriculture (irrigation needed for ~ 40% of world’s food) electricity (large amount generated using hydropower) industrial production cities in the desert (sustainable?)
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Global Water Balance and the Hydrologic Cycle
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Worldwide Water Usage 70% to agriculture (irrigation) 20% to industrial uses 10% is for direct human use Annual global withdraw is expected to rise ~10% every  decade
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Water has many unique properties universal solvent only natural substance on earth found in all three states  (solid, liquid, gas) high specific heat index high heats of fusion and vaporization high surface tension (sticky and elastic) solid less dense than liquid (ice floats)
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 – driven mostly by solar energy Some deep groundwater aquifers are not connected or weakly connected to the surface water system Dense  vegetation  tends to  promote 
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This note was uploaded on 10/28/2011 for the course NRES 102 taught by Professor David during the Fall '11 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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water_resources - WaterResources QuantityandQuality...

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