Chap014 - Chapter 14 - Global Supply Management CHAPTER 14...

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Chapter 14 - Global Supply Management C HAPTER 14 Global Supply Management Topics Covered The Importance of Global Supply Reasons for Global Purchasing Potential Problem Areas Selecting and Managing Offshore Suppliers Global Sourcing Organizations Intermediaries Information Sources for Locating and Evaluating International Suppliers Incoterms Global Sourcing Tools Countertrade Foreign Trade Zones Bonded Warehouses TIBs and Duty Drawbacks Trading Agreements North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) European Union (EU) ASEAN Mercosur Andean Community World Trade Organization (WTO) Emerging Markets Conclusion Questions for Review and Discussion References Cases 14–1 Trojan Technologies 14–2 Marc Biron 14-1
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Chapter 14 - Global Supply Management QUIZ RESPONSES A 1 . When there is a large number of common requirements across facilities or business units, and the supply base is dispersed geographically, an appropriate global sourcing structure is: a. a global commodity management organization. b. regional purchasing offices that manage the region’s spend for every commodity. c. a centralized international purchasing office equidistant from key suppliers. d. a centrally managed global sourcing office located in the corporate headquarters. e. a decentralized structure where purchasing managers are at each facility. C 2 . A foreign trade zone (FTZ) in the U. S.: a. facilitates rapid calculation of import duties. b. facilitates rapid calculation and payment of import duties. c. creates and maintains jobs in the United States that might have gone offshore. d. is completely different in purpose from a maquiladora in Mexico. a. must use only goods made in the U. S. according to the Buy America Act. A 3 . When sourcing internationally: a. the buyer should learn about the culture, customs, norms, taboos, and history of the supplier’s country. b. the need for personal space is generally the same in most regions of the world. c. the global availability and use of email, fax, and phone has largely eliminated communication barriers. d. differing cultural and social norms will have little impact since most businesspeople are accustomed to working with North Americans. a. the buyer should immediately establish an informal first-name basis with the supplier’s representatives. 14-2
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Chapter 14 - Global Supply Management A 4 . The United Nations Convention for the International Sale of Goods (CISG): a. is automatically applied if both nations have adopted the CISG, unless another body of law is agreed upon in the contract. b. is automatically applied if both nations have adopted the CISG, and there can be no exceptions. c. replaces the UCC as the worldwide body of law governing international trade. d.
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This note was uploaded on 10/28/2011 for the course P 320 taught by Professor Lee during the Spring '11 term at Columbus State University.

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Chap014 - Chapter 14 - Global Supply Management CHAPTER 14...

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