Later - Later NHTSA took feedback on a proposed rule to...

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Later, NHTSA took feedback on a proposed rule to permit switches, a rule that was promulgated and is now in effect. However, the airbag continues to be a lightning rod for discussion and controversy. One of the key researchers who testified of the need for airbags over twenty years ago recently testified that he was wrong and that passenger-side airbags don’t save enough lives to justify their risk and expense. John Graham, the director of Harvard’s Center for Risk Analysis, announced his change of heart at a National Transportation Safety Board hearing. In 2000, Congress directed the DOT to develop guidelines for airbags that would satisfy the safety requirements but would not result in injury to smaller occupants in cars. The NHTSA published a final rule in December 2001 that required airbags and deployment at 25 mph, but several consumer groups challenged the final rule as creating additional safety problems for vehicle occupants and being promulgated in defiance of existing evidence and studies, making the rules “arbitrary and capricious.” The NHTSA continued with the rule, and the consumer groups took the agency to court. In the case [ Public Citizen, Inc. v Mineta, 374 F.3d 1251 (D.C. Cir. 2004)], the court concluded that experts and consumers can disagree on the agency’s rule,
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Later - Later NHTSA took feedback on a proposed rule to...

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