237 - Table of Contents Chapter Pages Chapter 1:...

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Unformatted text preview: Table of Contents Chapter Pages Chapter 1: Interactive Graphing 1.1 1.7 Chapter 2: M-files 2.1 2.6 Chapter 3: Data Plotting 3.1 3.11 Chapter 4: Three Dimensional Plotting 4.1 4.12 Chapter 5: Contour Plots 5.1 5.10 Chapter 6: Symbolic and Numeric Calculation 6.1 6.9 Chapter 7: Parametric Surfaces 7.1 7.8 Chapter 8: Field Plots 8.1 8.6 Chapter 9: Integration 9.1 9.13 Chapter 10: Sequences and Series 10.1 10.11 Chapter 11: Power Series 11.1 11.6 References R .1 Index of Commands I.1 I.2 N.B. We use the symbol ! in the text to denote the end of the discussion of an example. 1: Interactive Graphing Matlab, which is a name contracted from MATrix LAB, is a widely used scientific software package. The goal of these notes is to teach you how to use it to ! construct graphs of curves and surfaces ! perform symbolic calculations, such as differentiation and integration ! write programs to facilitate carrying out the first two tasks ! present your results as a finished report suitable for printing or presentation. In this section we will focus on interactive graphing. Later, we will consider aspects of Matlab that deal with numerical calculations, done both interactively and via programming. We will make use of the Symbolic Toolbox, which is installed on the system in the Math department lab and comes bundled as part of the Student Edition of Matlab. Using the Symbolic Toolbox allows us to employ a language and style that are closer to everyday mathematics. This often makes it easier to figure out how to do things. As we said, this chapter will involve a lot of interactive work with the program. This means "show and tell." We will demonstrate what to do in class, but not write much about how to do it. So coming to the lab will be very useful in figuring out how to complete the assignment described later. First we will create plots of expressions in one variable. 1.1 Simple Plots First declare a symbolic variable: syms x Matlab gives no response, but having declared the variable symbolic, we can enter expressions in this variable. y=sin(x) y = sin(x) After a brief delay while Matlab loads the package of symbolic commands, the system returns the definition you proposed. 1.1 2007 by Edward Grossman, reproduction for non-commercial use permitted x Example 1 .1: Plot on the interval [0 sin( ) y " ,2 ] # . Enhance the graph with additional features. Solution: We enter the following command at the prompt. ezplot(y,[0,2*pi]) 1Interactive Plotting 1 2 3 4 5 6-1-0.5 0.5 1 x sin(x) This figure appears in a new window, called a Figure window. We can customize many features of the graph interactively using the window. Among the features we will learn to change are a) adding grid lines b) adding or changing labels and tick marks on the axes c) changing the color of the graph d) changing the plotting style of the graph, for example, dotted, or a heavier line e) adding a legend (useful when we have more than one graph displayed on the same...
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This note was uploaded on 10/28/2011 for the course MATH 195 taught by Professor Ocken during the Spring '11 term at CUNY Hunter.

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237 - Table of Contents Chapter Pages Chapter 1:...

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