Three Forms of Proof

Three Forms of Proof - Three Forms of Proof In order to...

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Three Forms of Proof In order to effectively persuade a person, one must provide enough information to validate their views or position on a topic. In other words, the persuader must have the ability to follow what he says with some sort of proof or reasoning. Proof gives the persuader the credibility he needs to convince the listener to believe him and consider the persuasion. This is a very important concept, because most people are willing to change their views or actions if there is a sufficient amount of proof coming from the persuader. For example, many people are persuaded by fitness commercials to buy exercise equipment, because these commercials inform people of the benefits while showing before and after photos to prove their products show positive results. There are three forms of proof: logos, ethos, and pathos. Knowing about each of these types of proof will guarantee one more success in persuading others. The first form of proof is logos. Logos is the Greek translation of “word.” The concept of logos is using reasoning and logic to persuade. This is why logos is the most important part of proof within persuasion. There are two types of reasoning: inductive and deductive. Inductive reasoning involves gathering relevant information on a topic, and then using this information to derive, in some cases, a theory, or generalization. For example, a person notices that clouds gather and turn grey just before it starts to rain. This person may use inductive reasoning to
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Three Forms of Proof - Three Forms of Proof In order to...

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