Drama final paper

Drama final paper - The relationship between parents and...

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The relationship between parents and their children is one that can be characterized in many ways. It is impossible to find a perfect relationship because as humans we are imperfect and even after raising several children no parent can have the “perfect relationship.” The relationship issue is very dominant in the plays from this course, but a few of the relationships that really are notable are the relationships between lady Bracknell and Gwendolen, and also the relationship between Troy and Cory. These relationships though not necessarily similar teach us as readers some very important lessons about parenting and the interactions between child and parent. All that is necessary to be a parent cannot be learned through a book but through real personal experiences which is what makes all relationships special in their own way. In the play The Importance of Being Earnest, the parent child relationship between Lady Bracknell and Gwendolen is a typical mother-daughter conflict that we would see in a play or any other sort of production. It is the overbearing matriarch who will have nothing to do with her daughter marrying anyone other than the man she picks. In the play, Gwendolen is in love with Earnest (Jack) although her mother already does not approve. In the first act we find Lady Bracknell does not find Jack fit for Gwendolen to marry though their “love” seems quite strong. Bracknell makes a mockery of Jack for his family heritage which leads only back to a handbag and forbids Gwendolen from marrying Jack. But as we would expect from a young girl who is in love, Gwendolen goes against her mother and goes back to Jack to get his address for his home in the country. During this instance, it appears that Wilde is on the side of Gwendolen and that he finds Bracknell overbearing and a pushy woman. This is shown by his making her a matriarch who on occasion would force Lord Bracknell, “to dine upstairs. Fortunately, he is accustomed to that.” This attitude definitely does not present her as the loving wife that is submissive or at least equal to the husband that we see in many other works.
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In the second act, Gwendolen comes to the country house to see Ernest but this is done without her mother’s consent which once again is an example of her rebellion. The third act is the one in which most of the parenting really takes place. The beginning of the act shows the
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