romanticism-1

romanticism-1 - Romanticism Caspar David Friedrich The...

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Romanticism Caspar David Friedrich, The Abbey in the Oakwood (1809-10)
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Romanticism as “Counter-Enlightenment” Francisco de Goya, The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters (ca. 1 In many respects, the Romantic movement was a direct reaction against the art and philosophy of the Enlightenment era. Enlightenment Romanticism Reason Emotion Intellect Imagination Culture Nature Classicism (Greco-Roman influence) Medievalism (Gothic influence) Perfection of Form Uniqueness of Content
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The Sublime During the Romantic period, many artists and writers strove to create art that was “sublime” as opposed to merely “beautiful”. The British writer Edmund Burke was one of the first thinkers to make the distinction between “the sublime” and “the beautiful”. The concept was further developed by German philosophers such as Immanuel Kant. Whereas the “beautiful” displays a clear order and harmony whose comprehension by the mind gives us pleasure, the “sublime” possesses a grandeur and magnitude that cannot be fully understood or measured by the intellect. Thus, whereas our reaction to the beautiful is simple enjoyment, our reaction to the sublime is more complicated, and is a mixture of Caspar David Friedrich, Wanderer above the Sea of Fog (18
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Beautiful
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Sublime
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Imagination and Artistic Genius Ludwig Van Beethoven Romanticism emphasized the creative role of the artist as an individual. The popular understanding of artists as eccentric nonconformists who struggle to express their personal experiences and emotions through their art is largely a product of the Romantic era. For the Romantics, artistic creation was not an entirely rational process; great art came not from mere mastery of form and technique, but from the inspiration of the imagination, which transcended our conscious understanding. “The primary Imagination I hold to be the living power and prime agent of all human perception, and as a repetition in the finite mind of the eternal act of creation in the infinite I AM. .” – Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Biographia Literaria
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau Although he was a contemporary of French Enlightenment writers such as Voltaire and Diderot, Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712- 1778) is nevertheless considered a precursor of the Romantic movement. Rousseau’s Confessions is one of the first modern examples of what would become known as autobiography. His subjective examination of the intimate details of his personal life will have a great effect upon Romantic notions of subjectivity and artistic expression. Rousseau was also a political theorist. He believed that human beings were naturally good, but became corrupted by society. His concept of primitive humans as “noble savages”, innocent and free from the negative influence of civilization, will become extremely popular with the Romantics.
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“I am commencing and undertaking, hitherto without precedent, and which will never find an imitator. I desire to
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This document was uploaded on 10/29/2011 for the course VS 150 at SUNY Buffalo.

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romanticism-1 - Romanticism Caspar David Friedrich The...

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