Data Structures & Alogs HW_Part_7

Data Structures & Alogs HW_Part_7 - 25 Move curr to...

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25 // Move curr to prev position template <class Elem> void LList<Elem>::prev() { link* temp = curr; while (temp->next!=curr) temp=temp->next; curr = temp; } (b) The answer is rather similar to that of Part (a). 4.7 The space required by the array-based list implementation is f xed. It must be at least n spaces to hold n elements, for a lower bound of Ω( n ) .However ,the actual number of elements in the array ( n ) can be arbitrarily small compared to the size of the list array. 4.8 D is number of elements; E is in bytes; P is in bytes; and n is number of elements. Setting number of elements as e and number of bytes as b ,the equation has form e > eb/ ( b + b )= eb/b = e for a comparison of e>e which is correct. 4.9 (a) Since E =8 , P =4 ,and D =20 , the break-even point occurs when n = (20)(8) / (4+8)=13 1 3 . So, the linked list is more ef f cient when 13 or fewer elements are stored. (b) Since E =2 , P =4 ,and D =30 , the break-even point occurs when n = (30)(2) / (2+4)=10 . So, the linked list is more ef f cient when less than 10 elements are stored. (c) Since E =1 , P =4 ,and D =30 , the break-even point occurs when n = (30)(1) / (1+4)=6 .
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This document was uploaded on 10/31/2011 for the course BCN 3431 at University of Florida.

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Data Structures &amp; Alogs HW_Part_7 - 25 Move curr to...

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