The+many - animal. Happiness, then, is best, finest, and...

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The many, the most vulgar, would seem to conceive the good and happiness as pleasure, and hence they also like the life of gratification. In this they appear completely slavish, since the life they decide on is a life for grazing animals….[L]iving is apparently shared with plants, but what we are looking for is the special function of a human being; hence we should set aside the life of nutrition and growth. The life next in order is some sort of life of sense perception; but this too is apparently shared with horse, ox, and every
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Unformatted text preview: animal. Happiness, then, is best, finest, and most pleasant.It is not surprising, then, that we regard neither ox, nor horse, nor any other kind of animal as happy; for none of them can share in this sort of activity. For the same reason a child is not happy either, since his age prevents him from doing these sorts of actions. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics , 1095b18, 1098a1-3, 1099a25, 1099b33-1100a2...
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This document was uploaded on 10/29/2011 for the course POLI SCI 101 at Rutgers.

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