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Unformatted text preview: "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests. (3) It is not perfect. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) We hope other companies follow suit. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7)The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests. (3) It is not perfect. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) We hope other companies follow suit. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. Ques/on 1: What are the indicators, convenMonal and otherwise ...? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests. (3) It is not perfect. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) We hope other companies follow suit. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. The indicators are as above ... Ques/on 2: What are the candidate main conclusions? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests. (3) It is not perfect. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) [c?: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (7) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But [c?: transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie]. The indicators are as above ... and at least two candidate main conclusions as well ... Which candidate is the best one to choose? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests. (3) It is not perfect. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) NOf ahe equests to take d5) and (17), it seems ot t ll rchoice, between ( own informaMon are bad. (13) T(he tat least arguably, is the beZer that 5), otals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright candidate. and trademark law. (14) Wihat the data can eaker The "hope" indicator n (5) may seem wdo, says Nthan tWong, Google's deputy general hat icole he "could" indicator in (17), but w counsel, is tprecisely it the sense of "hope" here. "I more o help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet cpeed limit," nd hope you're driving the s ensorship a monitoring. (15) The company ithe sense that an someone might say, not in s trying to get outside nonprofit to phoping this, but f n the sense they are literally rint the texts o i the leZers that they are fffering k prescripMon, that Google gets asking oor this a ind of informaMon, which "you should be dmore material about the would provide riving the speed limit." specific nhis same the requests. here seems to In t ature of sense, the author be saying that the measures Google (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent is taking could be helpful, and that others expression. governments from trying to suppress should follow suit. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help eAs always, ee where the biggest problems veryone s the choice among candidate main lie. conclusions is provisional, in the sense that it has to conMnue to make sense as we develop the rest of the analysis, but I think that of the two, (5) is arguably the beZer choice. Ques/on 3: ... ? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests. (3) It is not perfect. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. Ques/on 3: What reason or reasons most immediately suggest c? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) It is not perfect. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent govern- ments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. Looking first to (1) the therefore test seems not to (8) Google has been candid about the fact that suggest that it supports c more likely just the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, background but seems more successful with (2) as China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing suggesMng c, which we label thus r1, and ... looking considers its requests for data to be a state secret, to (3) and following, ask: what other reasons may work with it to do so, jointly or independently? and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are do not like, and to provide data about their users. bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove (2) [r1: Google took a welcome step toward material that violates the law, including copyright transparency last week when it unveiled a new and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, tool that reports on both of these kinds of says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general requests]. (3) [EA: It is not perfect]. (4) But it counsel, is to help start a more informed should promote a more informed discussion conversaMon about Internet censorship and about government monitoring of the Internet. monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers suit]. Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various specific nature of the requests. countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent govern- ments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. ... looking now to what's next available, (3), the (8) Google has been candid about the fact that therefore test seems not to confirm it as r2 in any the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, obvious way, but it also seems that more than just China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing mere background ... not unreasonable to label it an considers its requests for data to be a state secret, explicit assumpMon ... and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a What if anything can be working with r1 ...? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [EA: It is not perfect]. (4) But it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent govern- ments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. The therefore test seems to confirm no subsequent reasons suggesMng c together with r1. Ques/on 4: Is r1 basic or non-basic, and if the laZer what reason or reasons suggest it immediately? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1/ic1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [EA: It is not perfect]. (4) But [r2: it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet]. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent govern- ments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie. Looking to (4) as first available, the therefore test seems to confirm it as a reason suggesMng r1, and so we label it r2, and re-label r1 r1/ic1. ... (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing What now may be working with r2, jointly or considers its requests for data to be a state secret, independently, to suggest r1? and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1/ic1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [ea: It is not perfect]. (4) But [r2: it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet]. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression. (17) But [r3: transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie]. It seems, at least provisionally, working through (6) and following, using the therefore test as needed, we find no obvious candidates at first ... unMl we get to (17), which does seem to suggest r1/ic1, in the spirit of r2, and so we label it r3. "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1/ic1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [ea: It is not perfect]. (4) But [r2: it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet]. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) [ea: InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression]. (17) But [r3: transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie]. ... In the process, we stumble on what seems to "sound like" (3), and at least provisionally we label it an explicit assumpMon ... moving then to ... Ques/on 5: What reason or reasons suggest r2 and r3, beginning with r2? "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1/ic1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [EA: It is not perfect]. (4) But [r2/ic1: it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet]. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) [r4: Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009]. (7) The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) [ea: InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression]. (17) But [r3: transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie]. It seems, at least provisionally, that working through (6) and following, using the therefore test as needed, we find that the first available, (6), is a good candidate for suggesMng r2/ic1, and so we label it r4 and move on to the next candidate ... "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1/ic1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [ea: It is not perfect]. (4) But [r2/ic1: it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet]. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) [r4: Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009]. (7) [r5: The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with]. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) [ea: InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression]. (17) But [r3: transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie]. Likewise, though again and as always provisionally for the Mme being, working through (7) and following, using the therefore test as needed, reveals it as suggesMng r2/ic1 as well, and we label it r5 and move on to the next candidate ... "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1/ic1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [ea: It is not perfect]. (4) But [r2/ic1: it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet]. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) [r4: Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009]. (7) [r5: The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with]. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad. (13) The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law. (14) [r6: What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring]. (15) The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests. (16) [ea: InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression]. (17) But [r3: transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie]. The next available candidates, however, from (8) on, using the therefore test, seem not to be obvious candidates for suggesMng r2/ic1 as well, unMl we get to (14), and the "says Nicole" porMon in parMcular, which we label r6 and move to the next candidate ... "Google and Government Monitoring," New York Times, Editorial, May 2, 2010 (1) Governments across the globe are quietly asking tech companies to take down material they do not like, and to provide data about their users. (2) [r1/ic1: Google took a welcome step toward transparency last week when it unveiled a new tool that reports on both of these kinds of requests]. (3) [ea: It is not perfect]. (4) But [r2/ic1: it should promote a more informed discussion about government monitoring of the Internet]. (5) [c: We hope other companies follow [Google's] suit]. (6) [r4: Google's new tool showed, at its launch, the number of requests for informaMon from various countries between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2009]. (7) [r5: The data is broken down by country, and if you click on a specific country, you get details like what percentage of requests for data removal the company complied with]. (8) Google has been candid about the fact that the data is not complete. (9) On the global map, China has a big quesMon mark over it. (10) Beijing considers its requests for data to be a state secret, and Google is not providing any. (11) Because a single request can be to take down one Web page or hundreds, the numbers give only a rough picture. (12) [r7: Not all requests to take down informaMon are bad]. (13) [r8: The totals include requests to remove material that violates the law, including copyright and trademark law]. (14) [r6: What the data can do, says Nicole Wong, Google's deputy general counsel, is to help start a more informed conversaMon about Internet censorship and monitoring]. (15) [r9: The company is trying to get an outside nonprofit to print the texts of the leZers Google gets asking for this kind of informaMon, which would provide more material about the specific nature of the requests]. (16) [ea: InformaMon alone will not prevent governments from trying to suppress expression]. (17) But [r3/ic2: transparency tools like this one could help everyone see where the biggest problems lie]. (5) (2) (4) (6) (7) (14) (12) (17) (13) (15) (1) is background, and (3) and (16) are explicit assumpMons ...
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This document was uploaded on 10/29/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 101 at Rutgers.

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