Balancing Family and Work--Blackboard

Balancing Family and Work--Blackboard - 4/5/2010...

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4/5/2010 1 ANNOUNCEMENTS Quiz 4: was available on Monday evening Will Cover Education and Career/Work MUST be taken by April 12 th . Reminder : Writing Assignment 3 Due this Thursday Extra Credit Opportunities on Blackboard BALANCING FAMILY AND WORK M EN HOLD THE M AJORITY OF P RESTIGIOUS P OSITIONS IN M OST F IELDS The higher up in a company you go, the fewer women are generally found. Gender differences in leadership and rank may be self-perpetuating. Men hold the most prestigious positions in traditionally male as well as traditionally female occupations.
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4/5/2010 2 CONCEPTS THAT EXPLAIN GENDER DISPARITIES IN EMPLOYMENT Glass ceiling : refers to invisible but powerful barriers that prevent women from advancing beyond a certain level. Sticky Floor : occurs in traditional women’s jobs (e.g., secretaries) where there is no ladder, or path to higher positions. C ONCEPTS THAT EXPLAIN GENDER DISPARITIES IN EMPLOYMENT ( CONT D ) Maternal wall : women get less desirable assignments and more limited advancement opportunities once they have children. Sex Discrimination : business practices that lead to women receiving considerably lower pay and promotions than what they should earn. O THER R EASONS FOR THE G ENDER E ARNINGS G AP 1. Some jobs are valued more highly than others: Example: Child care providers earn less than car washer or parking lot attendants 2. Women are clustered in lower-paying jobs. Health care, office/administration, childcare, teaching. The greater the number of women or people of color in the job, the lower the salary.
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4/5/2010 3 O THER R EASONS FOR THE G ENDER E ARNINGS G AP 3. Human capital argument : Salaries are based on the investment of a person’s ―human capital‖ (i.e., how much education, training, and work experience a person brings to their job). Existing Argument: women have invested less ―human capital‖ in their careers than men Women (36 hrs/wk); Men (42 hrs/wk) Why? Does the ―human capital argument‖ explain the wage gap entirely? (only 50%-statistically) A GE D ISCRIMINATION OMEN Labor force participation of middle-aged and older women has increased in the past 3 decades. 14% of single women, over age 65 are currently in the labor
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This document was uploaded on 10/31/2011 for the course PSYC 310 at South Carolina.

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Balancing Family and Work--Blackboard - 4/5/2010...

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