371 - issue 12/March 2010 YOUR PATHFINDER INTO THE FUTURE...

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Unformatted text preview: issue 12/March 2010 YOUR PATHFINDER INTO THE FUTURE David Report TIME TO RETHINK DESIGN Foreword Has Design reached its sell by date? Have we not fulfilled Design’s 20th Century’s mission to market, style, brand, and added value, to innovate and to experiment through design? Is it not time to pause and rethink, and question why, before we react the same way in the 21st Century? We are increasingly dwelling in a created world, and for over half the world’s population this is the environment of the designed metropolis. Do we need any more, can we desire much less? Do we need any more, can we desire much less? Let’s face it; design is now a major source of pollution, as process and a phenomenon, design has degenerated into a state of aesthetic proliferation that has reached accumulative and destructive levels, in terms of loss of meaning, value, and identity. The result is a vacancy of purpose, a world full of ‘de- signer jetsam and flotsam’ that is swilling around or embedded into or above our planet; poorly designed products, unwanted solutions, unfriendly materials, and a mutli-choice of artefacts that are discarded as fast as they were adopted. Advertising signs in Mong Kok Display at Boffi kitchens Has Design reached its sell by date? Swedish milk bottle From cars, mobiles, computers, lighting, chairs to clothing, packaging, food and toys, driven by our daily addiction for the new, there is a lack of respect for the well tried, trusted, and workable. The iPhone may be the zenith of iconic user design, but why is it encased in glossy shell when we are required to purchase add-on protection to resist daily wear and tear. Is this design fit for purpose, one asks? Is this design fit for purpose, one asks? Landfill compactor in work The iPhone consuming what we really need, rather than what we believe we want Why can’t products be allowed to collect memories like good leather chair, why don’t we accept the patina of usage like a loved skateboard, when will we accept aging as life’s rich story, like a prized broach our grandmother left us, or the lines of our grand father’s face, of a life well lived! Whilst our perceived redemption has been our recent passion for sustainability and energy efficiency, this has come from the expense of surplus, and for the majority who remain in a state of abundant denial. We have to face the fact, that as with climate change, we are at a tipping point when the equilibrium is lost, and like our current economic crisis, the currency of good design is devalued by a tsunami of rapid change when everything good or bad is submerged and becomes equally conta- minated and loses its relevance. Face of a life well lived. a design pandemic of gibberish and solutions for the one, and not the many Ideas are evidence of imagination and expression of human ingenuity, but do all ideas have to be made, and masqueraded as design solutions? Why are we so complacent, should we not be calling for a guerrilla war against ‘designerism’, antiviral campaigns against...
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371 - issue 12/March 2010 YOUR PATHFINDER INTO THE FUTURE...

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