Analyzing One's Own Beliefs

Analyzing One's Own Beliefs - Analyzing Ones Own Beliefs...

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Analyzing One’s Own Beliefs paper title: Analyzing One's Own Beliefs paper ID: 201400627 author: Linville, Coyalita Analyzing One’s Own Beliefs Tina Case Study PCN 605 Psychopathology and Counseling Instructor Marcie Burger L.P.C Grand Canyon University By Coyalita Linville BH.R.S. 1
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Analyzing One’s Own Beliefs The following is a textual case study evaluation and assessment of a 17 year old Navajo female who is brought into a counselor's office for symptoms of depression; her family has noticed that she is more withdrawn than usual and she is often observed crying and talking to herself. Through the intake interview, the counselor learns that Tina hears voices daily that command her to perform certain acts of hygiene (showering, combing her hair, etc). She further reveals that she believes these voices to be the result of witchcraft that her boyfriend is using to control her. Tina also states that she has used methamphetamines heavily for the past several months. She and her mother ask the counselor to work with Tina on the depression, but claim that they wish to see a medicine man for hearing voices. Initial evaluation revealed the following: 1. Excessive methamphetamine use for the past several months, therefore I believe that it can be safely determined that the demonstration of symptoms of psychoses and depression are more than likely drug induced . 2. Secondly, due to the clients’ culture she believes in witchcraft which may be her way of explaining the correlation between the voices she hears, rather than relating her condition to the heavy use of methamphetamine. 3. The depressive symptoms can also be further attributed to the drug use, due to the use of methamphetamine does create depressive episodes often to the point of suicidal ideation. 2
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Analyzing One’s Own Beliefs 4. Tina’s withdrawn moods and talking to herself and crying are often found in cases of methamphetamine use, as well as mood swings between crying or extreme anger. 5.
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This note was uploaded on 10/30/2011 for the course LPC COUNSE PCN 605 taught by Professor Marcieburger during the Fall '11 term at Grand Canyon.

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Analyzing One's Own Beliefs - Analyzing Ones Own Beliefs...

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