Object-oriented Design - Object-oriented Design Ian...

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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 1 Object-oriented Design
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 2 Objectives To explain how a software design may be represented as a set of interacting objects that manage their own state and operations To describe the activities in the object- oriented design process To introduce various models that can be used to describe an object-oriented design To show how the UML may be used to represent these models
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 3 Topics covered Objects and object classes An object-oriented design process Design evolution
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 4 Object-oriented development Object-oriented analysis, design and programming are related but distinct. OOA is concerned with developing an object model of the application domain. OOD is concerned with developing an object- oriented system model to implement requirements. OOP is concerned with realising an OOD using an OO programming language such as Java or C++.
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 5 Characteristics of OOD Objects are abstractions of real-world or system entities and manage themselves. Objects are independent and encapsulate state and representation information. System functionality is expressed in terms of object services. Shared data areas are eliminated. Objects communicate by message passing. Objects may be distributed and may execute sequentially or in parallel.
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 6 Interacting objects
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 7 Advantages of OOD Easier maintenance. Objects may be understood as stand-alone entities. Objects are potentially reusable components. For some systems, there may be an obvious mapping from real world entities to system objects.
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 8 Objects and object classes Objects are entities in a software system which represent instances of real-world and system entities. Object classes are templates for objects. They may be used to create objects. Object classes may inherit attributes and services from other object classes.
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©Ian Sommerville 2004 Software Engineering, 7th edition. Chapter 14 Slide 9 Objects and object classes An object is an entity that has a state and a defined set of operations which operate on that state. The state is represented as a set of object attributes. The operations associated with the object provide services to other objects (clients) which request these services when some computation is required.
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Object-oriented Design - Object-oriented Design Ian...

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