HSTFINAL - Hayes Ryan Hayes HST 111 Prof Jackson Final Exam...

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Hayes Ryan Hayes HST 111 Prof Jackson Final Exam There are many misconceptions of the Civil War. One would be that the North completely dominated the Confederacy during this war. Instead, it was actually more of a stalemate. Nobody had a clear advantage. The south had more military experience, and if it weren’t for the lack of resources, the Confederates would probably be running the country right now. But this was not the case, as it was more of a battle of who had the resources to win the
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Hayes war. Fortunately, two scholars realize that resources were the lifeline of the war, and in particular, salt was a major factor in how the Confederates lost the Civil War. Salt in general, as described by Ella Lonn, was necessary for life as well as weapons. She gives us a reason why it seemed like the North dominated the war, and it was simply because the North had salt (Lonn 13). First, salt is needed for a person’s health. For example, she says, “An inadequate amount of salt in the ration means the absence of hydrochloric acid in the gastric to further digestion, and a lack of sodium chloride in the blood” (Lonn 13). During the war, salt was necessary to be healthy and successful on the battlefield. For example, “A hoof and tongue disease which appeared among the cavalry horses of General Lee’s army in 1862 was attributed to the lack of salt or to the use of new corn” (Lonn 13). Now that we know what the salt was used for, we need to know what happened with the South. Geography might be the answer as to why the Southerners lost the war. There seemed to be much more salt in the North than in the South, or maybe it was because the North was more industrialized. For example, Ella says, “In 1858, Virginia, Kentucky, Florida, and Texas yielded 2,365,000 bushels as compared with 12,000,000 bushels derived from New York, and Pennsylvannia” (Lonn 31-32). The advantage was clearly the North, since they had almost 6 times as much bushels as the South. Another reason why the South lacked the simple commodity was because of “heartless extortion, inadequate transportation, and the blockade” (Lonn 35). Ella makes a final point by saying, “The fact that salt could become a major problem to the confederacy reveals strikingly the industrial backwardness of the south” (Lonn 230). Since salt was so rare for the Confederacy, the Union knew where to find it. Whisonant, the next scholar, describes how the Union attacked Saltville, Virginia. He says of the day before the battle, “Tomorrow, men would fight and die to determine whether North or South would
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Hayes control Saltville and its massive salt production facilities, by far the single most important source of this precious mineral in the entire Confederacy” (Whisonant 21). How important was this production site called Saltville? “…During its peak war year in 1864 (Saltville) manufactured about 4,000,000 bushels, an estimated two-thirds of all the salt required by the Confedracy” (Whisonant 21). Multiple battles at Saltville showed how important this was to the South.
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HSTFINAL - Hayes Ryan Hayes HST 111 Prof Jackson Final Exam...

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