Ethical Standards

Ethical Standards - Running Head: ETHICS AND THE MEDIA...

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Running Head: ETHICS AND THE MEDIA 1 Ethical Standards in Media Organizations and Businesses Troy University Date: August 23, 2011 Ethical Standards in Media Organizations
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ETHICS AND THE MEDIA 2 Advertisers and marketers covertly and immorally cultivate the culture of youth in order to sell products while at the same time saying that they are merely responding to natural changes in society. Is it wrong for advertisers to market goods aimed at teens by showing other supposed teens participating in wild parties or crazy antics? Are the advertisers secretly orchestrating this behavior to relate an aura of adultness and fun to their products so that teens and young adults will want to buy them? Is it manipulation followed by exploitation or is it merely industry representatives giving teens what they want and reflecting their society in advertising. Most people have very strong ethical beliefs that children or even teens should not participate in this type of labor. The second chapter of our book covers child labor and societal ethics. Societal ethics “include such things as the legal system, customs in a society or culture, and in the norms and values that people use to interact with each other.” (Jones & Mathew, 2010) I will argue that the media buys the image of what it is to be a teenager and sells it back to the teens that it originated and in the process lowers the standards of behavior in the group in the process. These media hunter’s who are known as the advertising and marketing personnel, are responsible for these accounts, proactively go out searching for the next big thing amongst teens and then market it to the mainstream, consumer market. The methods they use to do this are suspect at least and more often than not downright evil. They look for children or teens with self-interest issues. Self-Interest “individuals face ethical issues when they weigh personal interests against the impact of their actions on others. Research suggests that individuals with The idea of the media using the youths’ desire to be older and actively influencing them to immoral behavior is an ethical issue because it is not right for these companies to exploit the youths’ desire just to sell products, especially products that children and underage teens should
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ETHICS AND THE MEDIA 3 not have in the first place. It is perfectly legal for them to do business that way though so that negates this problem being a legal issue, or at least an exclusively legal issue. Additionally, while politicians are taking steps to change this, it is not a matter of politics per se. The underlying problem is that these media hunter’s are behaving in a way to actively exploit another group’s desire to be something they are not for financial gain, and in the process, they are telling them that it is ok for them to behave the way that they think they are supposed to. As a result of a survey done of 777 teenagers “more than 40 percent of teens admitted they might
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This note was uploaded on 11/01/2011 for the course MGT 4471 taught by Professor Miller during the Fall '11 term at Troy.

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Ethical Standards - Running Head: ETHICS AND THE MEDIA...

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