Chapter 12 Managing Workforce Flow - jans

Chapter 12 Managing - Chapter 12 Managing Workforce Flow One study found that when firms telephoned their new hires to encourage them to maintain

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Chapter 12 Managing Workforce Flow One study found that when firms telephoned their new hires to encourage them to maintain their commitment to their new jobs, fewer of them failed to report to work. (pg. 321) Orienting and Socializing New Employees Many organizations invest more money in hiring new employees than in helping them acclimate and become productive. (pg. 321) On average, the time for new external hires to achieve full productivity is eight weeks for clerical jobs, 20 weeks for professionals, and more than 25 weeks for executives. (pg. 321) Even in restaurants and hotels it can take about 90 days for a new employee to attain the productivity level of an existing employee. (pg. 321) Because most turnover occurs during the first few months on the job, firms can increase the retention rates of their new employees by helping them adjust to their companies and jobs. (pg. 321) Many managers, in fact, say that high turnover rates are the biggest obstacle to their companies’ growth efforts. (pg. 321) Orientation, or onboarding, is the process of completing new hires’ employment-related paper work, providing them with keys, identification cards, workspaces, and technology such as computers, company e-mail addresses, and telephone numbers. It also includes introducing the new hires to their coworkers (who will be important to their success), and familiarizing them with their jobs and with the company’s work policies and benefits. (pg. 321) Orientation is not the same as training, however. Training provides employees with the knowledge and skills they need to do their jobs, whereas orientation is about an employee fitting in as an organizational member. (pg. 322) Technology can also facilitate the orientation of a firm’s new hires. (pg. 322) Socialization is a long-term process of planned and unplanned, formal and informal activities and experiences through which an individual acquires the attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge needed to successfully participate as a member of an organization and learns the firm’s culture. (pg. 322) Socialization helps new employees understand the values, processes, and traditions of the company and prepares them to fit into the organization and establish productive work relationships. The process is important for all employees, including part-time and temporary employees, and employees moving to new jobs within their companies. (pg. 322) For an organization’s traditions and values to survive, new members must be taught to see the organizational world as do their more experienced colleagues. (pg. 322) The primary goal of socialization is to get new employees up to speed on their jobs and familiarize them with the organization’s culture, which consists of the company’s norms, values, behavior patterns, rituals, language, and traditions. (pg. 322) One of the most important functions of socialization is to help new hires adjust to the company’s culture. (pg. 322) John Van Maanen and Edgar Schein (pg. 322)
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This note was uploaded on 11/01/2011 for the course MGT 4481 taught by Professor Hunter during the Fall '11 term at Troy.

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Chapter 12 Managing - Chapter 12 Managing Workforce Flow One study found that when firms telephoned their new hires to encourage them to maintain

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