Greek1001_Part_5 - Each form is composed of two parts...

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15 Each form is composed of two parts (called morphemes) both of which convey meaning– a stem (called a stem morpheme) and a case ending (called inflectional morpheme). The stem conveys the root meaning of the word, while the ending indicates case and so suggests possible syntactical functions for the word within a sentence. Important Note About Adjectives: As you all know adjectives modify nouns. Let's add some adjectives to our basic sentence: The angry boy hit the red ball. The addition of adjectives “angry” and “red” gives us additional information about the nouns in the sentence. Again, in our English sentence, we know that “angry” is describing the boy because of word order. In a Greek sentence, however, the sentence could be written in any of the following ways: The boy angry red the ball hit. The ball the boy hit angry red. The red boy hit the angry ball. etc. Since word order does not provide telltale clues on matching adjectives to their nouns, again Greek depends on form to do that. Thus, adjectives must mimic the case, number
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This document was uploaded on 11/01/2011 for the course GRK 1001 at University of Florida.

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Greek1001_Part_5 - Each form is composed of two parts...

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