A Database Design Methodology

A Database Design Methodology - DB Design Methodology- 1 A...

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DB Design Methodology- 1 A Database Design Methodology Area of application: Design of database with its applications. Perspective: The method assumes that the primary purpose of the future system is to automate current or planned activities of the enterprise. The method assumes (as do all database design methodologies) that dif- ferent views on the enterprise, conflicts, and political differences will be resolved during the database design process. Life-Cycle: The life-cycle comprises the following steps: Project Progress Report: Phase I g I.1. Environment & Requirement Analysis g I.2. System Analysis & Specification Project Progress Report: Phase II g II.1. Conceptual Modeling g II.2. Logical Modeling g II.3. Task Emulation g II.4. Optimization (NOT REQUIRED for the 424 project) Project Progress Report: Phase III g III. Implementation g III.1 Convert Emulated tasks to code g III.2 Bulk-Loading & Tuning (LIMITED for the 424 project) g III.3 Testing Limitation: The methodology does not cover implementation, testing, maintenance, and project management.
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DB Design Methodology- 2 Example Design a Merryland State Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) Informa- tion System The system must support all activities of the Merryland State MVA. The tasks of the MVA include maintaining all information pertaining to: vehicle emissions, license maintenance , vehicle registration maintenance, fine and fee maintenance, driving record maintenance and report genera- tion. Etc., etc., . ..
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DB Design Methodology- 3 I.1. Environment & Requirements Analysis The purpose of this phase is to investigate the information needs of and the activities within the enterprise and determine the boundary of the design problem (not necessarily identical to the boundary of the future computerized system, if any). Input: Information describing the current status of the enterprise, possible inefficiencies, plans for the future, and constraints that have to be satisfied in conducting business. Output: A Top-Level Information Flow Diagram describing the major docu- ments and functions, and the boundary of the design problem. The docu- ments include the major input, output, and internal documents. The functions model the major activities within the enterprise. Function: To collect the information about the enterprise and design the top-level information flow diagram.
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DB Design Methodology- 4 Guidelines: g Techniques: collect information by contacting interviews of people at all levels of the organization; analyze questionnaires; review short and long term plans, business manuals, files, forms, etc. Tools: express a top-level information flow diagram to capture the func- tions and important documents of the enterprise, and to start the design with the i/o documents and work from the outside in towards a "top-level" design.
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A Database Design Methodology - DB Design Methodology- 1 A...

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