MUSC-171-Final-Exam-Notes.docx - MUSC 171 Final Exam Weeks...

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MUSC 171 Final Exam: Weeks 5 -12Week 51.Rock and RollOrigins-Mix of R&B and country-Boogie woogie piano-Stop timeRole of Women in Early Rock and Roll-Excluded women-Before rock and roll women were selling to white audiences, such as “How Much is That Doggie in the Window” by Patti Page-Once Rock and Roll hit, women declined on the charts-Women were infantilized; talked about as “babies” or were also talked about as “dangerous” (heart breakers) Events that allowed independent music labels to compete-Independent radio stations – looking for cheap music that they could air-The 45 rpm – made music more affordable since you didn’t have to buy the whole record; in the 1950s, the 45 records were popular for radio stations; they had one song on each side-Youth market – Todd Storz and Gordon McLendon developed a series of radio station chains and they realized the new youth music had become popular amongst the kids (since they could afford them) but they were in school all day. So they started “Top 40 Radio” so that the songs would be repeated throughout the dayTop 40 Radio-Faster rotation of songs2.“Shake, Rattle and Roll” ComparisonBackground to Big Joe TurnerTurner’s version of the song (1954, R&B):-12 m sections-Musical structure – aab lyric structure-Tempo – more upbeat than the Blues; dance music for the Black population-Use of piano – boogie woogie piano-Low-end emphasis – baritone sax-Backbeat – prominent backbeat on snare; claps
-Lyric content – more sexual lyrics3.Background to Bill HaleyBill Haley’s version of the song (1954, Rock and Roll):-Riff-Structure – chorus melody at opening so people can recall the original-Tempo – faster tempo; makes it more danceable for white folks-Key – Higher key-Instrumentation – piano deemphasized-High-end emphasis - they take it up in energy-Lyric content – less sexual-Overall much more radio friendly4.1950s Cover Versions: The Case of “Hound Dog”History of “Big Mama” Thornton-At this time in the 1950s the chart idea came into effect-Pop charts (white) and R&B charts (black)-If a song became high on the R&B chart a white artist would often cover it to try and get it on the pop chartsThornton’s “Hound Dog,” 1952, R&B version-Church, gospel-Written by two men – Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller-Structural and stylistic analysis:-12 m sections (though not entirely regular-aab lyric structure-low-end emphasis-moderate tempo-sexual lyrics-raspy/deep voice-lots of improvisation-guitar solo – improvisation-shuffle 8ths
History of Elvis Presley and important socio-cultural background informationa)Musical trends in the 1950s – trend of covering R&B songsb)Sam Phillips, Memphis Recording (1950s) and Sun Records (1952)-From Alabama / was familiar with many different sounds and genres. Raised near African Americans-1944 moves to Memphis-Becomes a DJ-In 1950 founds the Memphis recording service, would have people come in off the street and record a song for $2-1952 creates Sun records-

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