Mongolian and Korean

Mongolian and Korean - Mongolian THROAT-SINGING Originally,...

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Mongolian THROAT-SINGING Originally, much of Mongolia’s music had spiritual and religious significance, because music was often considered a form of communication between the worlds of humans and spirits. The capital city of Mongolia is hardly a haven for traditional culture. The Mongolian term for type of singing is khoomei, while in English it is called throat-singing or overtone singing. In overtone singing, the performer – formerly only male, now female as well – produces, usually with significant pressure, a fundamental and by shaping the mouth cavity brings out different patterns of overtones. A tone in which the lower overtones are emphasized will likely sound “warm” whereas one in which the upper overtones are emphasized will likely sound “bright,” “harsh”. The sound is meant to imitate the sounds of nature, attempting the duplicate the rich timbres of natural phenomena, such as the rushing water, and this unique style of singing is closely tied to the animistic beliefs still held by many Mongolians. Korea
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Mongolian and Korean - Mongolian THROAT-SINGING Originally,...

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