PDBA.101._Common_Traits_of_Successful_Traders_and_Investors

PDBA.101._Common_Traits_of_Successful_Traders_and_Investors...

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The 4 Basics Elements Of Stock Value The ancient Greeks proposed earth, fire, water and air as the main building blocks of all matter, and classified all things as a mixture of these elements. Investing has a similar set of four basic elements that investors use to break down a stock's value. In this article, we will look at the four ratios and what they can tell you about a stock. Earth: The Price-to-Book Ratio (P/B) Made for glass-half-empty people, the price-to-book (P/B) ratio represents the value of the company if it is torn up and sold today. This is useful to know because many companies in mature industries falter in terms of growth but can still be a good value based on their assets. The book value usually includes equipment, buildings, land, and anything else that can be sold, including stock holdings and bonds. With purely financial firms, the book value can fluctuate with the market as these stocks tend to have a portfolio of assets that goes up and down in value. Industrial companies tend to have a book value based more in physical assets, which depreciate year after year according to accounting rules. In either case, a low P/B ratio can protect you - but only if it's accurate. This means an investor has to look deeper into the actual assets making up the ratio. Fire: Price-to-Earnings Ratio (P/E) The price to earnings (P/E) ratio is possibly the most scrutinized of all the ratios. If sudden increases in a stock's price are the sizzle, then the P/E ratio is the steak. A stock can go up in value without significant earnings increases - this happened most recently in the tech bubble - but the P/E ratio is what decides if it can stay up. Without earnings to back up the price, a stock will eventually fall back down. The reason for this is simple: a P/E ratio can be thought of as how long a stock will take to pay back your investment if there is no change in the business. A stock trading at $20 per share with earning of $2 per share has a P/E ratio of 10, which is sometimes seen as meaning that you'll make your money back in 10 years if nothing changes. The reason stocks tend to have high P/E ratios is that investors try to predict which stocks will enjoy progressively larger earnings. An investor may buy a stock with a P/E ratio of 30 if he or she thinks it will double its earnings every year (shortening the payoff period significantly). If this fails to happen, then the stock will fall back down to a more reasonable P/E ratio. If the stock does manage to double earnings, then it will likely continue to trade at a high P/E ratio. You should only compare P/E ratios between companies in similar industries and markets. (If these numbers have you in the dark, these easy calculations should help light the way, see How To Find P/E And PEG Ratios .) Air: The PEG Ratio Because the P/E ratio isn't enough in and of itself, many investors use the price to earnings growth (PEG) ratio. Instead of merely looking at the price and earnings, the PEG ratio
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This document was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course BUSINESS BA 101 at Montgomery.

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PDBA.101._Common_Traits_of_Successful_Traders_and_Investors...

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