2010-03-05_155427_policediscretion

2010-03-05_155427_policediscretion - 1 POLICE DISCRETION 2...

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1 POLICE DISCRETION
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2 POLICE DISCRETION Introduction The test of a true leader is his/her capacity to adhere to a strong foundation of ethics, articulate them as standards for colleagues and staff, and "practice what she/he preaches" by example on a daily basis. Personal leadership values form this ethical foundation, and are based upon past life experiences and current work processes that seek to improve rights and services for victims of crime. Ethical behavior reflects a sense of self-respect that translates into respect for others in all encounters. The process of living one’s personal values in a leadership role requires being in touch with one’s inner world of purpose, dreams, principles, aspirations, and ethics, which in the end gives meaning to one’s life. The application of a leadership lifestyle is challenging and requires total commitment to the concept of integrity. Police discretion is a very simple situation. If you are a police officer, far removed
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3 POLICE DISCRETION from the Chief, the supervisory personnel, and anyone who can control what you do, you have the ability to make personal decisions that determine how the law is or is not enforced. In an ideal world every speeder would be caught, every drunk driver would be pulled over, and every stolen bike would be tracked until it was located. The same “discretionary power” occurs in every organization. The farther you are from the people who supervise you, the more you will have to be able to make decisions for yourself in situations. Sometimes doing that is easy and follows a set procedure and it will be followed the same way everywhere. Other times it will be something that you must modify and adjust individually to fit the situation and the possibilities instead of following some norm or set of procedures. Reality is much different from this, however. For many thefts, unless it is something that has a large value and can be easily identified, like artwork, cars, boats, and large jewels, there will be little follow up on the case and the insurance company will be the people that the victim will mainly deal with. There is only one drunk driving arrest for every 27,000 miles of drunk driving. “You could expect to drive all the way across the country, and then back, and then back and forth three more times, chugging beers all the while, before you got pulled over.” (Levitt and Dubner) Therefore, as a member of the police force, you will have many opportunities to make these discretionary decisions yourself. Whether a foot, bike, motorcycle, or automobile patrol, you will have to decide when it is smartest to stop a driver, when to
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This note was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course POLICING T 333 taught by Professor Crystaldickersonbynum during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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2010-03-05_155427_policediscretion - 1 POLICE DISCRETION 2...

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