Juries have tremendous power over people

Juries have tremendous power over people - Juries have...

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Juries have tremendous power over people's lives. Granting them such power directly expresses our faith in an institution that is central to our vision of democratic governance, and our confidence that jury verdicts can be fair, unbiased, and accurate. In recent years, however, many concerns have been raised about the jury system's viability. One primary concern is that juries have become inefficient and serve as a drain on limited judicial resources. Concerns have also been raised about the quality and integrity of the outcomes reached by juries. Many critics believe that jurors are frequently biased, incompetent, and apathetic, and as such, render verdicts that are unprincipled and often unjust. Jurors frequently misunderstand instructions from the judge on legal issues, fail to recall critical evidence, and suffer from boredom and apathy during trials. Particularly in complex trials, jurors have trouble comprehending the evidence and that as a consequence, jurors reach verdicts that are arbitrary. Finally, there is a concern over the widespread negative perception that the public has
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This note was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course CRIM 303 taught by Professor Carloszuniga during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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Juries have tremendous power over people - Juries have...

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