prisons & jail final

prisons & jail final - PRISONS AND JAILS 1 Prisons...

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PRISONS AND JAILS 1 Prisons and Jails Sharon E. Williams La’Karia Sam Foundations of Criminal Justice/CJA303 February 12, 2011 Carlos Zuniga
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PRISONS AND JAILS 2 Prisons and Jails Society views prisons and jails as a method of punishment for individuals whom have committed crimes. Imprisonment is society’s way of enforcing righteousness on inmates for the crimes they have committed. Prisons have been in exists since the early eighteenth century. Prisons have not always been used to house inmates for long periods of time, only long enough for prisoners to pay off debts owned, those to soon be exiled, executed, or awaiting trial (Gaines & Miller, 2006). Walnut Street Prison was the first penitentiary built in 1790, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Gaines & Miller, 2006). The purpose of the prison was to divide the inmates from society and from one another; to provide them the opportunity to think about their offense and consider changing their ways. As the years progress, so did the prison system. In the nineteenth century inmates were kept in separate cells during the night, but worked together during the day. Today inmates work together during the day and share a cell at night. There are three types of prisons, maximum, medium, and minimum security. Jails are facilities used to hold individuals charged with misdemeanors, or awaiting pretrial. Jails are also used as temporary holding facilities for juvenile detainees pending transfers to juvenile authorities, detaining those who cannot post bail, those who violate probation and parole, and to cope with the excess amount of inmates from over crowed federal and state prisons. The number of prisoners in prison and jail has tripled since the late 1980, and continued to increase (Gaines & Miller, 2006). For years, state-run prison systems have done business with private industries to provide many needed services. These services include training, food, mental, health, educational, maintenance, recreational, psychological testing, security, and a variety of other correctional requirements. So would it not make sense to use a private prison for additional space to house inmates? According to Schmalleger, (2009), a private prison is a correctional institute managed
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PRISONS AND JAILS 3 by a private firm on behalf of a local or state government. Private prisons have grown over the years. Most are managed by private corporations instead of government and rely on profit and fee charges for continued existence. In 2003, private institutions housed over 90,000 inmates, representing more than 6.0 percent of all state prisoners and more than 12.0 percent of all federal prisoners (Gaines & Miller, 2006). In 2007, private facilities held more than 113,000 federal and state prisoners across 32 states representing “6.2 percent of all state prisoners and 14.4 percent of all federal prisoners” (Schmalleger, 2009). The movement towards privatization has grown. Privatization is generally defined as an agreement course of action that modifies public
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prisons & jail final - PRISONS AND JAILS 1 Prisons...

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