Pain of Union - Elizabeth Christy Pain of Union May 30 th...

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Unformatted text preview: Elizabeth Christy Pain of Union May 30 th 2010 Anastasia Martin Comparative Politics Rasmussen Business College Pain of Union The burden of the unification of Germany actually starts back when the Protestants and Catholics were fighting, which was the Thirty Years War (1618- 48). The war was never won, so Germany remained states between Catholics and Protestants. Prussia won wars against Denmark, Austria, and France while Chancellor Otto von Bismarck was in leadership, this happened between (1864-70). The new German state still remained much divided amongst the Protestants and Catholics. “Germany’s democrats found themselves sharply at odds with the dominant Prussian elite (Hauss, 2009, pg. 144).” Chancellor Otto von Bismarck had ruled for 20 years, and kept a good control over Germany. Once he left office in 1890, Germany began to fall apart. “The newly unified Germany lagged behind Britain and France economically and militarily (Hauss, 2009, pg. “The newly unified Germany lagged behind Britain and France economically and militarily (Hauss, 2009, pg....
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This note was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course ECONOMY G123/EC100 taught by Professor Melissa during the Spring '10 term at Rasmussen College.

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Pain of Union - Elizabeth Christy Pain of Union May 30 th...

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