Notes on editing marks

Notes on editing marks - Karen Penn de Martinez What do the...

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Unformatted text preview: Karen Penn de Martinez What do the marks on your paragraph mean? w.c. – word choice -- this isn’t the right word for what you mean (MS Word has a thesaurus which gives synonyms – hit the right button on the mouse on the word you want to look up) immense sva – subject-verb agreement (For example: Washington stand on the boat…should be Washington stands on the boat)- Remove this- move this item to here- w.f. – word form. This is a different form of the word you want, so it is grammatically incorrect here. v.t. – verb tense problem ? or “unclear” – it is not clear to me what you mean # or #agreement – the noun does not agree in number with the verb or modifier. Example: many soldier (should be many soldiers) or a clouds (should be a cloud or some clouds) r.o. – run on sentence. This means you have two sentences combined together. They can be separated with a coordinating conjunction (and, but, or, for, so, nor, yet) and a comma. Alternatively, you could put a period coordinating conjunction (and, but, or, for, so, nor, yet) and a comma....
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This document was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course ENGLISH EL 102 at Montgomery.

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Notes on editing marks - Karen Penn de Martinez What do the...

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