Chem 162-2011 lecture 16

Chem 162-2011 lecture 16 - CHEMISTRY 162-2011 LECTURE 16 Ed...

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CHEMISTRY 162-2011 LECTURE 16 Ed Tavss, PhD ANNOUNCEMENTS E-MAIL ATTENDANCE Sign in EXAMS QUIZ MISCELLANEOUS Chem 162-2011 Lecture 16 1
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PLAN FOR TODAY : CHAPTER 22 - TRANSITION METALS AND COORDINATION CHEMISTRY (22.7-22.9 or 20.7-20.9) 22.7 Warner’s Theory of Coordination Chemistry 22.8 Nomenclature of complex ions and coordination compounds 22.9 Isomerism in complex ions and coordination compounds Chem 162-2011 Lecture 16 2
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CHAPTER 16 - APPLICATIONS OF AQUEOUS EQUILIBRIA Chem 162-2011 Lecture 16 3
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Chem 162-2011 Lecture 16 4 PERIODIC TABLE AND PERIODIC PROPERTIES
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Coordination Compound Fundamentals Coordination Compound Fundamentals Ligand (L: ligo, to bind): A substance (neutral or anionic) having a lone electron pair that bonds to a transition metal cation (i.e., Lewis base-Lewis acid interaction). Usually a transition metal Complex ion: Transition metal cation + ligands Complex ion is sometimes called a complex. Complex ion is usually a cation, but could be neutral or anionic. The metal is usually, but not always, a transition metal;. Coordination compound (Transition) metal cation + ligands + counterions Complex ion (in brackets) The complex ion may be positively or negatively charged or uncharged; the counterions have the opposite charge; the purpose of the counterions is to make a zero charge overall; if the complex ion isn’t charged then there are no counterions. Coordination compound dissociation in aqueous solution: [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl]Cl 2 → [Co(NH 3 ) 5 Cl] 2+ + 2Cl - Alfred Werner (1893) theorized two types of Cl bonding in a single molecule to explain why AgNO 3 formed a precipitate with only two of the three chlorine atoms. This was the beginning of Coordination Chemistry. Ligands are much more tightly attached to the metal cation than are the counterions. The ligands are tightly attached to the metal cation through covalent bonds (actually coordinate covalent bonds [both electrons of the bond coming from one atom]), whereas the counterions move freely around the solution (weaker ion-dipole bonds with the solvent). - AgNO 3 will not react with the covalently bonded Cl; it will only react with the above two chloride counterions. Coordination number: The number of bonds between the metal ion and the ligands (6 in the above case; therefore, octahedral structure) Chem 162-2011 Lecture 16 5
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Ligand Types Ligand Types Unidentate Bonds to metal ion using only “one tooth” Include: NH 3 , Cl - , NO 2 - , CN - , OH - , H 2 O : C ≡ N: cyano-N or cyano-O, depending on which atom is bonded to the metal ion . . . . [ : O ― N = O:]
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Chem 162-2011 lecture 16 - CHEMISTRY 162-2011 LECTURE 16 Ed...

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