Nonverbal Analytic Exercise #3

Nonverbal Analytic Exercise #3 - Analytic Exercise:...

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Analytic Exercise: Personal Territories Nonverbal Communication Professor: Vasilyeva March 18, 2011 Analytic Exercise: Personal Territories
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Each person varies in how he or she establishes his or her territory depending on the context of the setting. In a public setting, people often use markers to claim temporary occupancy to establish their personal territory. Whereas central markers are used when people place items to mark their territory, boundary markers creates a sense that the entire place belongs to the person. In the face of territorial encroachment, people generally react to anyone who tries to invade their territory in a negative manner. “Invasion of a territory occurs when those not entitled to entrance or use nevertheless cross the boundaries and interrupt, halt, take over, or change the social meaning of the territory” (Lyman & Scott, 1975, p. 179). For this analytic exercise, observations took place in the following public settings: Starbucks Coffee Shop, AMC Loews Movie Theater, and on the 7 Subway Train. The first public setting took place at a local, high traffic Starbucks coffee shop near Hunter College in New York City. I noticed that the entire coffee shop was covered with transparent windows in which there was absolutely no privacy. With the calming yoga music playing in the background and the dimming of the lights, the place allowed me to relax and sip away my coffee. However, as a loyal customer of Starbucks, this specific location was definitely my least favorite one due to the poorly constructed seating arrangements. In order to maximize their limited seating space strategically, individual tables were eliminated. The inside seating area was composed of one handicapped-seating table, a rectangular table that accommodates six people with outlets nearby, and “bar” seating. The “bar” seating was unpopular because it consisted of one rectangular bar-height table with couple of stools and no outlets available nearby. The customers who visit this local Starbucks were typically Hunter College students and a few young professionals who work at the designer retail stores off of Lexington Avenue. Due
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to the amount of high-traffic, few available outlets offered, and limited seating in the coffee shop, it is always difficult for people to find a seat at the rectangular table with outlets. I noticed a young female dressed in a Hunter College sweatshirt and jeans juggling a cup
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Nonverbal Analytic Exercise #3 - Analytic Exercise:...

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