Decision Making and Conflict Case Study 2

Decision Making and Conflict Case Study 2 - Decision Making...

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Decision Making and Conflict According to Irving Janis (1989), three dimensions of constraints in terms of decision making are: cognitive, affiliative, and egocentric constraints. Cognitive constraints include direct and indirect acknowledgements, the sense of urgency in the matter, and the types of proposals that are available. While dealing with cognitive constraints, it is essential to emphasize the consequences of poor decision making. Affiliative constraints are present where there is an uneven distribution of interaction, uniformity pressures, camaraderie maintenance, or diversity accommodation. By reminding members the goals of the group, separating tasks from personalities, and appointing a devil’s advocate, affiliative constraints can be successfully dealt with. Ultimately, egocentric constraints occur when group decision making is influenced by a member of the group who feels the need to impose his or her own agenda. Members who show signs of egocentric influence rather adopt a win-lose orientation instead of making decisions
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This document was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course COMM 04:182:473 at Rutgers.

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Decision Making and Conflict Case Study 2 - Decision Making...

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