The Olmec-I - The Olmec The Geography and Ecology Art and...

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Unformatted text preview: The Olmec The Geography and Ecology Art and Technology Socio­Political Structure Religion Important Sites Who were the Olmec? Who Characteristic Traits Characteristic Basic Mesoamerican civilization? civilization? Evidence from Pottery Evidence http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp­dyn/articles/A32926­2005Feb17.html Pottery at Etlatongo Pottery Pottery is made from Clay found at San Lorenzo. Excavated by Jeffrey Blomster and colleagues. www.archaeology.org/online/features/olmec/ Map of Mesoamerica Map Geography and Ecology of Olmec Area Olmec http://mexico.udg.mx/historia/precolombinas/ingles/olmecas/ Art Art Jade Stingray spines Clamshells Ceramic babies Mirrors Sculpture Jade Jade Jade Axe Were­Jaguar Olmec Figure http://isis.csuhayward.edu/dbsw/anthropology/miller/3250/03olmec/aolmec2.html#PHOTO%20GALLERY: Ceramic Ceramic Duck Figure Human Figure http://isis.csuhayward.edu/dbsw/anthropology/miller/3250/03olmec/aolmec2.html#PHOTO%20GALLERY: Thrones/Altars Thrones/Altars Altar #4 La Venta Monument #19 La Venta Altar #5 La Venta http://isis.csuhayward.edu/dbsw/anthropology/miller/3250/03olmec/aolmec2.html#PHOTO%20GALLERY: Colossal Heads Colossal Colossal Head #10 Basalt San Lorenzo http://isis.csuhayward.edu/dbsw/anthropology/miller/3250/03olmec/aolmec2.html#PHOTO%20GALLERY: “Mutilation” Colossal Head #2 San Lorenzo Colossal Head #5 San Lorenzo http://isis.csuhayward.edu/dbsw/anthropology/miller/3250/03olmec/aolmec2.html#PHOTO%20GALLERY: Socio-Political Structure Socio-Political Chiefdom Religion Religion Continuity Hypothesis (Covarrubias) Stirling Hypothesis Astral Hypothesis (Mary Popenoe Hatch) Las Limas Hypothesis (Coe and Joralemon) Calendar Calendar The epi­Olmec ­ from 31B.C. ­ the peoples who subsequently inhabited the same lands and were probably descended at least in part from the Olmec, seem to have been the earliest users of the bar and dot system of recording time. The low relief on this stone shows the detail from a four­digit numerical recording, read as 15.6.16.18. The vigesimal (or base­20) counting system has been used across Mesoamerica. A value of 5 is represented by a bar, and a value of 1 is represented by a dot, such that the three bars and single dot here stands for 16. The Maya would later adopt this counting system for their Long Count calendar. The date in this relief is the oldest recorded date in Mesoamerica, corresponding to a day in the year 31 B.C. Detail of Long Count Date http://www.crystalinks.com/olmec.html Important sites included Important San Lorenzo Tres Zapotes Chalcatzingo La Venta ...
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This document was uploaded on 11/01/2011 for the course ANTH 331 at South Carolina.

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