Early Mesoamerican Villages-Students

Early Mesoamerican Villages-Students - Early Mesoamerican...

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Early Mesoamerican Villages Formative, Pre-Classic Periods Farming, Households
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Formative/Pre-Classic Chronology Early Formative (Pre-Classic) Period 1500/1800-900 BC Middle Formative (Pre-Classic) Period 900- 300 BC Late Formative (Pre-Classic) Period 300 BC - AD 300
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Formative/Pre-Classic Periods Characteristics Permanent Villages Wattle and Daub structures Domestic and public architecture Appearance of pottery Specialized crafts people Increased social stratification Increased population Beginnings of writing Increased trade
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Farming Slash and burn agriculture (called milpa by the Mayas) is also labor intensive. Modern-day Native Americans in Guatemala who employ this agriculture spend about 190 days every year in agricultural work. Despite this labor, there are at least 170 days are left over (almost half of a year) for other types of labor. This excess time was used in the Classic Period in the building and maintenance of cities as well as the extensive production of art-work and the agricultural labor necessary to support the priestly populations in the cities.
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Slash and Burn technique http://wpni01.auroraquanta.com/pv/mayaquest? sess_id=185536040766114&key_id=673&img=2235
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Amaranth Amaranth is cultivated in the Nahuatl (Aztec) speaking area of Zongolica, Veracruz using slash and burn techniques (Early 1982). Young amaranth greens are picked as vegetables and the grain is later harvested. The plants are allowed to naturally reseed themselves for a second planting. In the tropical Yanatile region of Southeastern Peru,
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Early Mesoamerican Villages-Students - Early Mesoamerican...

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