Chap7 - Chapter 7: Some Alternative Investment Rules 7.1 a....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 7: Some Alternative Investment Rules 7.1 a. The payback period is the time that it takes for the cumulative undiscounted cash inflows to equal the initial investment. Project A : Cumulative Undiscounted Cash Flows Year 1 = $4,000 Cumulative Undiscounted Cash Flows Year 2 = $4,000 +$3,500 = $7,500 Payback period = 2 Project A has a payback period of two years. Project B : Cumulative Undiscounted Cash Flows Year 1 = $2,500 Cumulative Undiscounted Cash Flows Year 2 = $2,500+$1,200 = $3,700 Cumulative Undiscounted Cash Flows Year 3 = $2,500+$1,200+$3,000 = $6,700 Project B ’s cumulative undiscounted cash flows exceed the initial investment of $5,000 by the end of year 3. The payback period for project B is 3 years. Companies can calculate a more precise value using fractional years. To calculate the fractional payback period for Project B, find the fraction of year 3’s cash flows that is needed for the company to have cumulative undiscounted cash flows of $5,000. Divide the difference between the initial investment and the cumulative undiscounted cash flows as of year 2 by the undiscounted cash flow of year 3. Payback period = 2 + ($5,000 - $3,700) / $3,000 = 2.43 Since project A has a shorter payback period than project B has, the company should choose project A . b. Discount each project’s cash flows at 15 percent. Choose the project with the highest NPV. Project A = -$7,500 + $4,000 / (1.15) + $3,500 / (1.15) 2 + $1,500 / (1.15) 3 = -$388.96 Project B = -$5,000 + $2,500 / (1.15) + $1,200 / (1.15) 2 + $3,000 / (1.15) 3 = $53.83 The firm should choose Project B since it has a higher NPV than Project A has. 7.2 a. After 6 years, the cumulative cash flows will be $900,000; after 7 years they will be $1,050,000. Therefore the payback period is 7 years. Answers to End-of-Chapter Problems B-57 b. Since the discounted payback period will always be greater than the undiscounted payback period when there are positive cash inflows, start the approximation at year 7. Cumulative Discounted Cash Flows Year 7 = $150,000 A 7 0.1 = $730,262.82 Cumulative Discounted Cash Flows Year 8 = $150,000 A 8 0.1 = $800,238.93 Cumulative Discounted Cash Flows Year 9 = $150,000 A 9 0.1 = $863,853.57 Cumulative Discounted Cash Flows Year 10 = $150,000 A 10 0.1 = $921,685.07 Cumulative Discounted Cash Flows Year 11 = $150,000 A 11 0.1 = $974,259.15 Cumulative Discounted Cash Flows Year 12 = $150,000 A 12 0.1 = $1,022,053.77 The cumulative discounted cash flows exceed the initial investment of $1,000,000 by the end of year 12, so the payback period for the project is 12 years. The discounted payback period is 12 years. c. Apply the perpetuity formula, discounted at 10 percent, to calculate the PV of the annual cash inflows....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course ACTSC 371 taught by Professor Wood during the Fall '08 term at Waterloo.

Page1 / 14

Chap7 - Chapter 7: Some Alternative Investment Rules 7.1 a....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online