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201 Literature Reviews

201 Literature Reviews - sections • Provide full citation...

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Literature Review Guidelines Instructor: Joshua Ballinger English 201—Justice and the Law Spring 2011 In this course, in addition to the class readings, you are required to read independent scholarly sources and write 5 literature reviews. These reviews should be between 300-500 words (2-3 pages), and should demonstrate that you have read the material closely, and that they comprehend it. The reviews can be of immense use not only in contributing to your body of knowledge about the topic under investigation, but also because sections of the reviews might be able to be imported directly into your research paper. The reviews must contain: A) A Scholarly Book (this excludes text books) B) A Journal Article C) An Internet Source (not Wikipedia) The Literature Reviews should not include any class readings, as reviews must be from sources that the students have discovered themselves. For each source read, students should write a Literature Review which includes the following
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Unformatted text preview: sections: • Provide full citation in MLA format • Provide a brief summary as to what the reading is about • Give some information on the author(s) • Define unfamiliar vocabulary and identify the key concepts of the piece • Give pertinent quotations • Explain the significance of each quotation, and interpret its meaning • Mention how the information either confirms the student's expectations, or surprises the student, and if so why • Explicitly explain how this material helps the student to answer the research questions posed, and how, therefore, it contributes to the student's research • For the second and subsequent readings, students should explicitly state how the new reading connects to previous readings that the student has done in this course, and trace areas of agreement and disagreement about particular topics. • Identify new questions so as to delve even more deeply into the research...
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