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franklin_emerson copy - From Poor Richard's Almanack...

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From Poor Richard's Almanack (1732-1758) by Benjamin Franklin There are no gains without pains. At the working man's house hunger looks in but dares not enter. Industry pays debts while despair increases them. Diligence is the mother of good luck. God gives all things to industry. Plough deep while sluggards sleep and you shall have corn to sell and to keep. Work while it is called today for you know not how much you may be hindered tomorrow. One today is worth two tomorrows. Have you something to do tomorrow? Do it today. If you were a servant would you not be ashamed that a good master should catch you idle? Then if you are your own master be ashamed to catch yourself idle. Trouble springs from idleness and grievous toil from needless ease. Industry gives comfort and plenty and respect. Keep thy shop and thy shop will keep thee.
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If you would have your business done, go; if not, send. Want of care does us more damage than want of knowledge. Not to oversee workmen is to leave them your purse open. If you would have a faithful servant and one that you like --- serve yourself. If you would be wealthy think of saving as well as getting: The Indies have not made Spain rich because her outgoes are greater than her incomes. Women and wine, game and deceit make the wealth small and the wants great. Many estates are spent in the getting, Since women for tea forsook spinning and knitting, And men for punch forsook hewing and splitting. What maintains one vice would bring up two children. You may think, perhaps, that a little tea, or a little punch now and then, diet a little more costly, clothes a little finer, and a little more entertainment now and then can be no great matter but remember what Poor Richard says "Many a little makes a mickle; beware of little expense for a small leak will sink a great ship." Buy what thou has no need of and ere long thou shall sell thy necessaries. Silks and satins, scarlet and velvets have put out the kitchen fire.
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never be spent. To be humble to superiors is duty, to equals courtesy, to inferiors nobleness. After crosses and losses Men grow humbler and wiser. Pride dines on Vanity, sups on Contempt. Pride breakfasted with Plenty Dined with poverty Supped with Infamy. Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other, and scarce in that. It is ill-manners to silence a fool and cruelty to let him go on. The wise man draws more advantage from his enemies than the fool from his friends. A learned blockhead is a greater blockhead than an ignorant one. The learned fool writes his nonsense in better languages than the unlearned; but still it is nonsense. He that lives upon hope will die fasting.
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This document was uploaded on 11/03/2011 for the course AMERICAN S 101 at Rutgers.

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franklin_emerson copy - From Poor Richard's Almanack...

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