electronical waste 2

Electronical waste 2 - TheDarkSideOf'Green'Bulbs;,ElectronicsReleases Toxins; Sara Schaefer Munoz Wall Street Journal(Eastern edition New York N.Y

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The Dark Side Of 'Green' Bulbs; Disposing of Fluorescents, Electronics Releases  Toxins; Companies Tout Recycling Sara Schaefer Munoz . Wall Street Journal . (Eastern edition). New York, N.Y.: Jan 24, 2008 . pg. D.1 c) 2008 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Reproduced with permission of copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. As Americans set up their new computers, TVs and other electronic goodies from the holidays, the increasingly eco-minded consumer is wondering: What should I do with the old ones? Rapidly improving technology and a consumer thirst for all the latest gadgets are leaving people with a growing number of old electronics . Even though they should be recycled, most end up in the trash or gather dust in the basement. Now, states and manufacturers are trying to make it easier for people to recycle old TVs, iPods and even fluorescent light bulbs. Retailers are seizing on "green" marketing opportunities by launching recycling initiatives. Best Buy Co. last year started a program that sponsors local drop-off events around the country, where people can bring in carloads of unused items. In October, Office Depot Inc. began selling recycling "boxes" at $5 to $15 that customers fill with office items such as laptops and fax machines to be recycled. (The company says the cost of the box helps fund the program.) Ace Hardware retailers in the Chicago area and Wisconsin last year started programs to recycle mercury-containing compact
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fluorescent bulbs; Wal- Mart Stores Inc. held a pilot take-back day last summer at 350 of its stores. Meanwhile, states are tightening their waste laws: Minnesota, for example, passed a law in 2007 that requires manufacturers of TVs and computers to collect and recycle by weight 60% of what they sold in the previous year. Computers, televisions and other electronics contain materials such as lead, cadmium and mercury, which can pose a risk to human health and the environment . Energy Star- labeled electronics -- touted as eco- friendly due to the energy they save -- still contain hazardous materials.
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This document was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course BIOLOGY Bi 105 at Montgomery.

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Electronical waste 2 - TheDarkSideOf'Green'Bulbs;,ElectronicsReleases Toxins; Sara Schaefer Munoz Wall Street Journal(Eastern edition New York N.Y

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